Al Jazeera America digital staff group photo

The Best of Al Jazeera America Digital

We've produced thousands of compelling stories. With the company set to close, check out some of our best work as we look to new opportunities.

Alex Newman
Deputy editor, interactive and mobile
Alex Newman is an interactive journalist specializing in data visualization, multimedia and user experience. She currently works on the interactive team at Al Jazeera America, where she is responsible for special projects using audio, video, data or graphics (or all of the above) and is the editorial lead for AJAM's award-winning mobile app.   stories
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Philly's invisible youth
The city's child welfare and emergency shelter systems continue to fail homeless kids — just as they did this reporter 17 years ago
Sack, cloth and ashes
The Children's Place CEO's 'reign of terror' has seen staff fired, activists arrested. Second story in a two-part series.
In Bangladesh, the sham of Shams Factory
Mega-chain The Children's Place continues to source clothes in unsafe sweatshops. First story in a two-part series.
Child obesity in Mexico
US sends its supersized diet to kids south of the border
Hard trucking
Independent truckers say new safety rules threaten their livelihood
Route of Division
In Birmingham, Alabama, a public bus takes about a dozen housekeepers from their low-income, mostly black neighborhood to a wealthy white suburb
In Texas, courts turn truancy cases into cash
An in-depth look at the Dallas County courts where children as young as 12 are prosecuted as adults for truancy. First story in a three-part series.
Return of the fish wars: Hatchery pits environmentalists against tribe
Can anything wild still exist in a Washington river that has been plugged for 100 years?
Nicaragua Canal ‘will destroy we’
Indigenous and Afro-Caribbeans worry $50 billion mega-project will be final blow to language and communal life
The billionaire behind the canal
Wang Jing's megaproject furthers China's aims in Latin America and deflates economic importance of Hong Kong
Underground Beijing
The Rat Tribe lives underneath the Chinese capital
Are you on the Crosscheck list?
Use the search boxes below to search through Crosscheck lists from Georgia and Virginia. If your name appears on this list, you are a potential double voter. Voting twice is a felony, punishable by 2 to 10 years in prison. Guilty or not, voters whose names appear on these lists could be purged from voter rolls.
Jim Crow returns: Millions threatened by electoral purge
The computer program Interstate Crosscheck disproportionately targets minority voters
Seeing green with Herbalife
In a working-class immigrant neighborhood in Queens, N.Y., there are plenty of Herbalife believers with small bank accounts but big American dreams
Vemma's army of young recruits
Students dream of cash and cars, but get a rude awakening. First story in a three-part series.
Mutant fish in the Susquehanna River
Smallmouth bass with grotesque open sores have been discovered in Pennsylvania’s sick waterway
Ebola's toll on West Africa
Thousands of people have contracted Ebola since the mid-1970s, but this year”s outbreak is the largest on record. Explore current and past outbreaks in West Africa in this interactive.
From carburetors to curling irons: The secret automotive history of Detroit's Hair Wars
How black hair artists got their start building Fords
Treasured Island
The people of Tangier fear their life, land and heritage could wash away
Rocking the symphony
Young black musicians change the face of classical music
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Alfonso Serrano
News Editor
Alfonso Serrano is a news editor at Al Jazeera America, where he writes and edits feature stories focused on Latin America, the drug war and immigration. Previously, he was a senior editor at TIME.com and an editor at Conde Nast Portfolio. His essays and commentary have appeared on National Public Radio, The Chicago Tribune, and Pacific News Service. He has received an Editor & Publisher EPPY award for coverage of the Nicaragua canal project and a PASS Award from The National Council on Crime and Delinquency for his reporting on San Francisco gang-related crime.   stories
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Parents of foreign fighters accuse Belgian police of inaction
Federal prosecutor demands maximum sentence for alleged recruiter for armed groups in Syria
France's Hollande: Change constitution to tighten security powers
State-of-emergency powers not enough, constitution should be changed to counter threats, French leader says
Afghan police sex abuse charges raise legal question for US aid
Experts say US military should have reported rampant abuse of boys by Afghan police to the State Department
Cuba's isolated act of faith
As Pope Francis visits the island, remote town builds the first new Catholic church since the revolution
With tear gas and razor wire, EU countries skirt international refugee law
Human rights experts question Europe’s heavy-handed approach to growing refugee crisis
Hiroshima: The great taboo
Analysis: The US has struggled to accept the legacy of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki into its collective memory
Titanic canal project divides Nicaragua
Critics say world's largest-ever engineering endeavor marks new era of colonization
Nicaragua Canal ‘will destroy we’
Indigenous and Afro-Caribbeans worry $50 billion mega-project will be final blow to language and communal life
The billionaire behind the canal
Wang Jing's megaproject furthers China's aims in Latin America and deflates economic importance of Hong Kong
Hygiene and Heartache: Homeless women's daily struggle to keep clean
For many homeless women, administering self-care on the streets is a time-consuming and dangerous endeavor
The Year in Drug Policy: Movement at a crossroads
2014 cemented the mainstream appeal of drug policy alternatives and propelled a movement into full gallop
The rebel spirit driving Mexico’s protests has deep roots
Outrage over case of 43 missing students has helped unleash widespread discontent with a deep historical echo
Dying for the promised land: Colombia struggles with land restitution law
Ambitious measure to help farmers reclaim land taken by rebels and paramilitaries faces major obstacles
Uruguay charts new course on marijuana legalization
Nation becomes first to legalize marijuana amid growing consensus that war on drugs is unsustainable
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Amel Ahmed
Digital News Producer/Reporter
Amel Ahmed is a New York-based journalist. As a reporter at Al Jazeera America (AJAM), she has focused on immigration, the ongoing conflict in Yemen, race issues in the U.S. legal system, public health and other topics. Before joining AJAM, she helped produce a documentary on gentrification in New York City entitled 'The Changing Face of Harlem.' In 2011, she traveled to Yemen, where she covered the revolution as a special correspondent for Al Jazeera English. She has also worked for Democracy Now. She obtained her B.A. from New York University, where she studied Journalism and Middle East & Islamic Studies. She also obtained a law degree from Brooklyn Law School.   stories
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Sandra Bland, Samuel DuBose and the rise of ‘vehicular stop and frisk’
Racially based stops for minor traffic violations on the rise because of court action and police practice, say activists
The 1997 law that limits compensation to victims of railway accidents
Analysis: By capping damages, Amtrak 'reform' hobbles judges' ability to compensate victims of mass railway accidents
Stranded Yemeni-Americans consider alternate escape routes
Two stranded Yemeni-Americans consider fleeing by sea or dangerous back roads as airstrikes grip Sanaa and Aden
Univ. of Oklahoma expulsions infringe free speech rights, experts say
Analysis: The Univ. of Oklahoma’s expulsion of students over a racist chant raises First Amendment, due process concerns
Cuban-Americans in NJ’s ‘Havana on the Hudson’ torn over new Cuba policy
Cuban-Americans in a New Jersey enclave express deep ambivalence over decision to renew relations with Cuba
‘Keep the peace, we all are hurting’: Eric Garner's family urges calm
Protests after NYC grand jury decides not to indict officer over chokehold death; grieving parents urge non-violence
Selling gender: Exploiting stereotypes for profit
Experts warn lack of media literacy leaves youth vulnerable to gendered toy marketing that stunts emotional growth
In Little Liberia, expats nervously eye those returning from Africa to NYC
Residents of Staten Island, home to the largest Liberian population outside Africa, fear for loved ones back home
Does slut-shaming start with school dress codes?
Enforcement of dress code policies play out against broader debate of sexualization of young women in American culture
Yemeni-Americans cry foul over passport revocations
Dozens of US citizens have had travel documents confiscated in a process questioned even within the State Department
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Atossa Araxia Abrahamian
opinion editor
Atossa Araxia Abrahamian is an opinion editor at Al Jazeera America, a longtime editor and contributor at The New Inquiry, and a contributing editor to Dissent magazine. Her first book, 'The Cosmopolites,' was published in 2015 by Columbia Global Reports. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, New York magazine, the London Review of Books, and other publications.   stories
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Nothing's more patriotic than a declaration of independence
We love to secede from everything, even the US of A
Why we love to hate the wife bonus
Americans have a fraught relationship with dependence – particularly when it concerns women
Democratize FIFA now!
Don’t blame the global south for corrupting soccer's organizing body
Down Syndrome isn't just cute
How the Down community sugarcoats difficult realities about the condition
Brechtomania
Why Marxist playwright Berthold Brecht is theater’s hottest old name
The yoga tax is good karma
Why it makes sense to tax services — even spiritual ones
Upworthy's unworthy politics
What happens when liberalism becomes a lifestyle choice?
The bitter tears of the American Christian supermajority
Why Christians feel victimized in America
Of mice and women
NIH insistence on using female animals in studies is vitally important to women'€™s health
Why Nate Silver can't explain it all
FiveThirtyEight and other new media projects pretend to offer explanatory journalism but lack self-awareness
3-D print your way to freedom and prosperity
The hidden politics of the ‘maker’ movement
Porn Stars vs. Paypal
Financial institutions need to stop discriminating against sex workers
How the north ended up on top of the map
A cartographic history of what’s up
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Azure Gilman
Reporter
Azure Gilman is a reporter for Al Jazeera America in New York City. She writes news stories and longer features about climate change, environmental threats to marine life, women's rights, and poverty in the United States. She often takes her own pictures and produces online videos to accompany her articles. Before coming to Al Jazeera America, she worked as a reporter at City & State Magazine, a research assistant for investigative journalist Wayne Barrett, and a writer for the Freakonomics blog. She received a Masters from Columbia Journalism School, and B.A. from the University of Chicago.   stories
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In warming ocean, record number of seals and sea lions sicken and starve
Ailing or dead seals and sea lions washed up on California beaches in record numbers in 2015; this year could be worse
‘We are excelling in every field’: Black students rebuff Justice Scalia
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's remarks about African-Americans and higher education cause pain and anger on campus
Orca capture trade has moved to Russia, China, activists say
Demand from aquatic theme parks in Russia, China fueling new market for wild orcas, marine experts say
A California crab ban reveals trouble in the Pacific Ocean
Crab fishing is delayed, and poisoned sea lions are washing ashore, with toxic algae to blame
Decision expected in Illinois over trans rights in locker rooms
An Illinois school district has defied federal regulations to give unrestricted locker room access to a trans female
Let it bee: Rise of urban apiaries has New York City buzzing
Since 2010, legions of honeybees have taken over the backyards and rooftops of New York City
The fight for clean water in Flint, Mich.
It’s not the government but private citizens and researchers who have been battling to reveal dangerous lead levels
San Francisco moves to cover diaper costs for low-income families
City officials plans to spend about $479,000 annually to distribute diapers monthly to families in need
Mayor’s body headed for topless bar? De Blasio vs. Times Square nudity
NYC task force seeking way to ban semi-naked women from working in Times Square, once home to peep shows galore
Forces look to mom-friendly policies to combat US women’s military fatigue
While the military is developing generous maternity packages, the country as a whole has no law mandating paid time off
The taxing problem of bringing up baby on meager wages
With sales tax on basic needs and complicated credits, low-income parents are hit hard by the cost of rearing
Diaper banks provide relief for struggling parents, starting at the bottom
Almost a third of families say they lack the diapers they need; network of nonprofits tries to fill that gap
New York Boricuas react to island’s crushing debt
Economic crisis is no shock to the 4.6 million Puerto Ricans who live in mainland US, more than 700,000 in NYC alone
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Ben Piven
Planning Editor
Ben Piven is an online editor and journalist with a combined 5 years at Al Jazeera America in New York City and Al Jazeera English in Doha. He reports on a range of international and domestic news, from global geopolitics and national security issues to economic and cultural material. Previously, Ben worked at PBS Worldfocus. He holds a master's degree in digital media from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. In 2007, he studied the caste system as a Fulbright scholar at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences in Mumbai, India.   stories
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California politicians to don donor logos if ballot initiative succeeds
Shock political campaign aims to make legislators’ corporate and union sponsors known to voting public
America’s new militia movement: Patriot groups explode under Obama
Occupation of Oregon federal facility highlights growth in armed anti-government groups
Trump’s untruths woo working-class whites who ‘want to be proud again’
Citing erroneous ‘facts’ about race and religion, candidate emphasizes economic, security failings
Gun companies lock up billions in sales, boosted by calls for tougher laws
Almost half the guns made in the US are produced by three companies: Smith & Wesson, Freedom Group and Sturm, Ruger
Being ‘hafu’ in Japan: Mixed-race people face ridicule, rejection
Among Japanese, the perception of pure ethnic background is a big part of belonging to the culture
Walls of the world aim to keep unwanted foreigners out, hold prosperity in
With Hungary’s razor wire fence and Trump's plans to seal border with Mexico, global barriers increasingly divide nations
Chinese company and Taliban battle over Afghanistan’s underground riches
Massive copper mine at Mes Aynak in Logar province could destroy antiquities site and displace villagers
Confederate bygones: Baltimore hoping to rename Robert E. Lee Park
Municipal officials considering name change in light of Charleston events and recent riots over death of Freddie Gray
‘Green Ramadan’ begins as pope calls for fast action on climate
Islamic holy month commences, with young activists advocating for environmental justice
GOP stands in way of Obama gambit for offshore corporate cash
President proposes to tax companies’ foreign profits for half-trillion in revenue but faces tough congressional fight
Star Wars Desert Rave
Thousands flock to movie sets in the Tunisian dunes despite political and economic turbulence
Yazidi families struggle to find and free enslaved daughters
UN condemns ‘barbaric acts’ but hits roadblocks in releasing thousands of girls still held by ISIL fighters
With US youth losing religion, evangelicals struggle to spread ‘good news’
More young Americans are turning away from organized faith as millennials question the mix with politics
Gaza’s underground: A vast tunnel network that empowers Hamas
An extensive system of concrete-lined passageways supports Gaza’s civilian economy and military activity
Timeline of Edward Snowden's revelations
Al Jazeera’s in-depth look back at a year of NSA leaks by the former government contractor
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Bianca Clendenin
Headline Writer, Social Media
Bianca writes and curates social media posts for Al Jazeera America's TV programming.  
Caroline Preston
Features Editor
Caroline Preston is a features editor at Al Jazeera America.   stories
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When officers rape: The police brutality chiefs ignore
Most departments are doing little to stop police officers from sexually assaulting civilians.
Kenya's dark path to justice
People affiliated with the ICC proceedings against top Kenyan leaders are turning up dead
Court fees trap ex-inmates in a prison of debt
In Washington, formerly incarcerated men and women face massive debts and a 12 percent interest rate
Amazon tribes fight against $9 billion dam
The Munduruku tribe fights a gigantic government project
Return of the fish wars: Hatchery pits environmentalists against tribe
Can anything wild still exist in a Washington river that has been plugged for 100 years?
Blood on the tracks: The short life and mysterious death of Deion Fludd
New York City teenager Deion Fludd died after an encounter with police on the subway. The NYPD and his family provide differing accounts of the events of that night.
Finding a place to stay
Across the country, homeless people struggle to find places to sit, sleep and pass time. Interviews with a dozen homeless and formerly homeless people illustrate the sorts of daily challenges people on the streets face. In this award-winning multimedia project, listen to the homeless and formerly homeless as they walk through their day and describe those challenges.
Flint., Mich., residents find state water control hard to swollow
Flint's water crisis
Afghanistan's team of rivals
Can former political foes overcome a bitter election to lead Afghanistan?
Old age in the big house
Aging prisoners
Reunited in Rwanda
Two sisters lost in the Rwandan diaspora find their way home
From marriage to murder
The story of a teenage bride who killed her husband
Will Cristal's college dream survive the summer?
Many low-income high school graduates who intend to enroll in college succumb to 'summer melt' and fail to matriculate
Vigilanteville: James McGibney and his online army
The Bullyville founder aims to stop the worst of the worst on the Internet — but critics say he's the real bully
When fracking comes to town
What it's like to live in the epicenter of fracking
Bonanza, pop. 1: Looking for a pulse in Colorado's smallest city
Tiny municipality faces extinction unless its supporters — and sole resident Mark Perkovich — get creative
At Hotel Louisville, the homeless serve the guests
A Kentucky nonprofit moves homeless recovering addicts into a hotel, then opens the hotel for business
Ms. Veteran America: Healing in Heels
More than just a pageant for skinny girls, contestants say, it's a chance to raise awareness about homeless veterans
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Courtney Brooks
Planning Editor
Courtney Brooks is a news and features editor who specializes in international diplomacy and issues in the United States, Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa and the former Soviet bloc. She has nine years of experience as a reporter, writer and editor. Her work has also appeared in World Policy Journal, The Associated Press, Agence France-Presse, The Irish Times, and Radio Free Europe, among others.   stories
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In Texas, insured and uninsured alike struggle to pay drug costs
In part 8 of ‘America left behind,’ Al Jazeera looks at the human impact of skyrocketing prescription drug prices
Mississippi's lost babies
In part 4 of ' America Left Behind,' Al Jazeera examines why black infant death outpaces Botswana
Navajo Nation's nutrition crisis
In Part 1 of our America Left Behind series, Al Jazeera looks at a community where 1 in 3 are diabetic or at risk
Nearly a quarter of Philadelphia’s adult population lacks basic literacy
In part 2 of our ‘America left behind’ series, Al Jazeera explores the vicious cycle of poverty and lack of education
Route of Division
In Birmingham, Alabama, a public bus takes about a dozen housekeepers from their low-income, mostly black neighborhood to a wealthy white suburb
St. Louis burning: A ticking time bomb beneath the city?
Nobody is really sure what is buried at the West Lake Landfill – or where it is
St. Louis burning: What killed the babies near Weldon Spring?
State health studies did little to ease residents’, activists’ concerns about potential radiation exposure in metro area
St. Louis burning: America’s atomic legacy haunts city
County parks, homes, businesses remain open and untested after decades of exposure to potentially contaminated creek
China’s Texas Hold ’em: Chemical plants flank historic black community
Neighborhood already home to many energy projects fears potential effects of proposed giant methanol plant
China’s Texas Hold ’em: Rick Perry and a Chinese plant on the Gulf
Al Jazeera investigates US and Chinese interests behind bid for $4.5B methanol plant in an underserved black community
How I escaped marrying a Boko Haram fighter
‘Wherever you go, even if you run all the way to Yola, we will run after you and kill you,’ leader told Ladi Apagu, 16
A death delayed: Rodney Reed now eyes exoneration, end to ‘racist’ justice
On eve of his scheduled execution – now stayed – condemned man speaks to Al Jazeera on his case and the justice system
Guns in schools: In tragedy’s shadow, efforts for gun reform in Newtown
Grass-roots initiatives aim to keep the ball rolling on national efforts against gun violence.
China’s Louisiana Purchase: Environmental concerns in ‘Cancer Alley’
Chinese company behind methanol plant in mostly black Louisiana town has come under fire for shirking health laws
China’s Louisiana Purchase: Who’s building a methanol plant on the bayou?
Al Jazeera investigates ties between Louisiana and the Chinese government in a proposed $1.85 billion methanol plant
After steel's fall, Christmas puts food on tables in America’s Bethlehem
Local opinion divided on the end of a production-driven economy
An uncertain path to reconciliation in CAR
With UN mission in early stages, local aid groups carry burden of justice
Fighting over the spoils of war in CAR
Resources, resentment at heart of conflict
In Central African Republic, a harvest of fear
Examining the roots of Central African Republic's Séléka rebel movement
For the roots of Salem witch hysteria, look at the next town over
Some descendants of accused witches in Danvers, once called Salem Village, say they are ready to address their legacy
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D. Parvaz
Senior Producer, Human Rights
D. Parvaz is the Senior Producer for Human Rights, based in New York. She was previously the Special Projects Editor at Al Jazeera English in Doha, Qatar. She has reported from Egypt, Lebanon, Libya, Syria, Japan, Afghanistan, Europe and the U.S.   stories
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Selling American Girls
Sex trafficking of minors in the US
Selling American Girls
Sex trafficking in the US
Finally heard: Former Guantanamo detainee 'beamed' into art installation
Mohammed el Gharani beamed into NY art installation
Life after Ebola: Liberia's invisible babies
Lowered birth registrations owing to fear of hospitals
The death penalty: How we kill
Various methods of execution legal in the US and what it really means to kill an inmate using using any one of them.
Lebanon's immigrant domestic workers remain vulnerable to abuse
How domestic workers are systematically abused in Lenanon
For migrants and forced laborers, help might be a decade away
The UN congress on crime and justice aims to fix migration and forced labor issues, but no date set for solutions
New York's 'Hamas lawyer' headed to prison
Stanley Cohen says he's the target of a political witch-hunt
Family of reporter jailed in Iran pleads for his release
The brother of journalist Jason Rezaian says his health is deteriorating in detention
Hearings begin on force-feeding a Gitmo prisoner
Heaing on trying to get Abu Dihab's force-feeding tapes released
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David Klion
Opinion Editor
David Klion is an opinion editor for Al Jazeera America based in New York. He was previously features editor for World Politics Review and recruited international guests, hosted interviews and edited videos for Bloggingheads.tv. His work has also appeared in The New Republic, The New Inquiry and other publications. A native of Washington, DC, he has a master's degree in history from the University of Chicago and has lived, worked and researched in Russia and the former Soviet Union.   stories
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The new ‘Star Wars’ isn’t a rip-off, it’s a classical epic
In reworking moments from the original trilogy, ‘The Force Awakens’ participates in an ancient narrative tradition
Trump's bigotry tests the limits of free speech
The US is unusual in its tolerance for hate speech, but the alternative may be worse
Inequality is destroying American democracy
The very rich support unpopular economic policies and often get their way
The real cultural explanation for school shootings
Teenagers raised in relentlessly competitive environments are learning a dangerous lesson
Real police reform is unlikely in Chicago
The only whistleblower from inside the police accountability system, among other experts, is skeptical
Driverless cars won't save Los Angeles
The much-hyped technology is no substitute for improved public transit and walkable streets
How virtual identities explain the San Bernardino attacks
Separate online identities are common and potentially vulnerable to radicalization
Mass shootings deserve the same urgency as terrorism
Policymakers who favor military action after one kind of attack are unwilling to take basic steps toward gun control
Saudi Arabia uses terrorism as an excuse for human rights abuses
The kingdom is ramping up executions of Shias, with the tacit approval of the United States
Black Lives Matter on campus, too
African-American student protests reflect the many anxieties facing the black middle class
The Mormon church turns against gay families
The Latter-day Saints plan to bar the children of gay couples – a move rife with contradictions
A tragic setback for Houston's trans residents
The anti-HERO campaign exposed the trans community’s vulnerabilities, and conservative hypocrisy
‘Assad must go’ is a barrier to peace in Syria
It’s time for pro-intervention hard-liners to be honest about what their position means
Blame Western companies for Southeast Asia's toxic haze
Global demand for palm oil has led to massive fires in Indonesia and air pollution throughout the region
The US needs to redefine poverty
The measurements used for the federal poverty level and the minimum wage are far too narrow
South African students show they have had enough
A professor at a major South African university explains why undergraduates took to the streets to stop fee increases
Hillary's hypocrisy on marijuana legalization
The presidential front-runner claims black lives matter but won’t support a popular reform that would save black lives
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Dean Visser
News Editor
Dean Visser is a news editor who has also worked as a foreign correspondent and regional editor in Asia for The Associated Press, The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek magazine and other publications. He has managed news teams in the office and reporters in the field, and has also done freelance work for radio and magazines.   stories
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World's largest 'tax-funded mass grave' might be turned into a park
NY City Council discusses turning Hart Island, where more 1 million poor and unclaimed people are buried, into a park
Parents of foreign fighters accuse Belgian police of inaction
Federal prosecutor demands maximum sentence for alleged recruiter for armed groups in Syria
As US politicians protest, security officials brush off refugee 'hysteria'
At Halifax security forum, military officials and security experts say blocking refugees carries its own risks
Orca capture trade has moved to Russia, China, activists say
Demand from aquatic theme parks in Russia, China fueling new market for wild orcas, marine experts say
Wariness, accusations surround this weekend's China-Taiwan summit
First leaders' meeting since 1940s civil war sparks fears about China's intentions toward democratic, self-ruled Taiwan
Wariness, accusations surround this weekend's China-Taiwan summit
First leaders' meeting since 1940s civil war sparks fears about China's intentions toward democratic, self-ruled Taiwan
The fight for clean water in Flint, Mich.
It’s not the government but private citizens and researchers who have been battling to reveal dangerous lead levels
Oklahoma halts all executions after lethal injection drug shipment mix-up
State officials refuse to name company that sent wrong drug hours before scheduled execution of Richard Glossip
Disaster after disaster in Marshall Islands blamed on climate change
Disaster after disaster hits Marshall Islands as climate change kicks in
Singapore's founding father, Lee Kuan Yew, dies at 91
Lee's use of authoritarian 'Asian values' in government widely credited by Singapore's success, eyed by other leaders
DEA approves study using MDMA for anxiety in seriously ill patients
DEA approves first such trial for MDMA; researchers say public support growing for therapy using psychadelic drugs
Six episodes of 'The Simpsons' that made us scream 'Ay, caramba!'
A look back at some of the most memorable and controversial antics of America's favorite animated family
Life in Michigan's dirtiest ZIP code
Some residents call the tar sands industry a threat to public safety, say stricter regulations are needed
Decades after internment, Japanese-Americans warn of what’s still possible
As they mark Day of Remembrance, former detainees say talk of national security can still trump Americans’ basic rights
Rock legend Lou Reed, as remembered by downtown Manhattan
New York mourns a man who embodied the city's grit, style and uncompromising cool
Rock legend Lou Reed, as remembered by downtown Manhattan
New York mourns a man who embodied the city's grit, style and uncompromising cool
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Dexter Mullins
Former Reporter
Dexter Mullins is an award winning multimedia journalist. He reports on race, education, inequality and issues impacting the LGBT community.   stories
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Survivors of infamous 1921 Tulsa race riot still hope for justice
Witness to the destruction of their world, they are dying before reparations can reach them
Study: Black college grads have double the unemployment rate
More than half of black college graduates are underemployed, according to the Center for Economic Policy and Research
New Orleans to be home to nation’s first all-charter school district
In September the Recovery School District will close its remaining non-charter schools, and other cities are watching
For homeless gay teens in Little Rock, few places to turn
Arkansas ranks third-worst in the nation for homeless children, and few shelters will take in LGBT teens
Desegregation funding dries up in Little Rock, but problems remain
Recent settlement to dismantle the desegregation efforts that had historic start in 1957
The Year in Gay Rights: A major victory for marriage, but more to do
Advocates celebrate the defeat of DOMA, but there are still major obstacles for gay-rights activists to overcome in 2014
In epidemic of campus sex crimes, LGBT cases often neglected
Nearly 4 million gay men, lesbians and bisexuals suffer sexual violence, but scope of problem in higher ed is unclear
Mississippi to make history by opening civil rights museum
Nation's first state-funded civil rights museum breaks ground Thursday, along with new state history museum
Historically black colleges in financial fight for their future
Institutions assert their relevance amid financial concerns, falling enrollment
Six decades after Brown ruling, US schools still segregated
Separated along socioeconomic and racial lines, schools are less diverse than at any other time in the last four decades
Map: America still divided by race
Data from 2010 Census shows America continues to be split along racial lines, even in the nation’s largest cities
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E. Tammy Kim
Staff writer, Features
Tammy writes about labor and poverty and arts and culture.   stories
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Up close and personnel: Neither workers nor bosses, human resources professionals straddle two worlds
The neglected back-office world of HR
The taxi wars: Uber is ‘destroying the taxi industry’
Houston cabbies say the UberX model, with drivers who dabble, is an insult to the profession
A Los Angeles poet's revolution of everyday life
As gentrification sweeps the city, Sesshu Foster has quietly become the poet laureate of a vanishing neighborhood
Court fees trap ex-inmates in a prison of debt
In Washington, formerly incarcerated men and women face massive debts and a 12 percent interest rate
Baltimore: The divided city where Freddie Gray lived and died
The protests in Baltimore aren’t just about Freddie Gray's death and police brutality. They're about the racialized poverty and dearth of opportunity in parts of the city, such as the Sandtown neighborhood where Gray grew up. The numbers tell some of that tale: The city's median household income is well under the Maryland average, the number of abandoned houses swelled in the past decades and the city's public schools are 'hypersegregated' by race.
Return of the fish wars: Hatchery pits environmentalists against tribe
Can anything wild still exist in a Washington river that has been plugged for 100 years?
Who counts as 'homeless' depends on how you ask
Counters in some 3,000 cities and counties across the country helped quantify the nation's homeless population this month. Yet critics warn against relying solely on this 'point-in-time' method and its underlying definition of homelessness, which could lead to undercounting. A proposed law would change the definition of homelessness and who qualifies for help.
Will Cristal's college dream survive the summer?
Many low-income high school graduates who intend to enroll in college succumb to 'summer melt' and fail to matriculate
‘Bob’s Burgers’ animates a struggling mom-and-pop shop
Not since ‘Roseanne’ has TV had a better portrait of the working-class family
In between in California
This collection of multimedia stories provides a snapshot of Californians living above the poverty level but still struggling. Meet five California households that earn too much to receive most government benefits yet too little to reliably make ends meet and are part of a growing in-between.
From carburetors to curling irons: The secret automotive history of Detroit's Hair Wars
How black hair artists got their start building Fords
A Lazarus drug goes mainstream in the heroin war
In Georgia, race of overdose victims may be a factor in new legislation expanding access to naloxone
Rocking the symphony
Young black musicians change the face of classical music
Getting by
Some 50 million Americans live below the official poverty line, and millions more are barely making ends meet. This photo series and community project explores how people try to survive.
At Hotel Louisville, the homeless serve the guests
A Kentucky nonprofit moves homeless recovering addicts into a hotel, then opens the hotel for business
Can parents accused of neglect redeem one another?
Parent peer advocacy gains institutional footing in New York City’s child welfare system
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Ehab Zahriyeh
News Producer
Ehab Zahriyeh is a news producer and reporter for Al Jazeera America's digital live desk. He covers breaking news and specializes in Palestine/ Israel coverage. He is also one of the digital team's 'CMS Power Users' — working closely with the product/ development to identify issues, brainstorm solutions, and provide further support for the editorial team.   stories
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Palestinian journalist to continue hunger strike despite risk of death
Mohammed al-Qeq has so far refused food for 65 days in protest of his detainment without charge in Israeli prison
NGOs warn changes to visa waiver program will affect aid efforts
Aid groups call for exceptions to the amendment, which requires a US visa for people who have visited Iraq, Syria
Mass shootings by the numbers: More than 350 in 2015
If it seems as if there has been a mass shooting in the US nearly every week this year, that’s because it’s true
Young Palestinians sound off on current unrest, Israeli occupation
With talk of third intifada, Palestinians under the age of 30 discuss where they see latest violence heading
Lauryn Hill joins black, Palestinian activists in solidarity video
Video, featuring dozens of artists and activists, draws comparisons between black and Palestinian struggles for justice
West Bank unrest tests loyalty of Palestinian Authority security forces
Analysis: End of peace process leaves PA forces, built on a promise of statehood, securing an unpopular status quo
Where do Gaza’s lions sleep tonight?
Israel’s siege of the Palestinian territory has forced Fat’hi Zoo’s beloved cubs into a refugee camp
Imam of torched Houston mosque meets Islamophobia with love
The Quba Islamic Institute is turning ‘something negative into a positive’ after receiving Islamophobic messages
Family and friends remember Chapel Hill shooting victims as heroes
Loved ones recount how the young shooting victims did charity work for war victims abroad and homeless in the US
Secretive scramble for lethal injection drugs prompts concern
Missouri is scheduled to carry out execution Wednesday amid growing concern over the means of delivering death
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Elizabeth Blish Hughes
News Editor, nights
Beth Hughes is a digital news editor based in San Francisco and New York who has worked in Hong Kong and Tokyo for The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg. She was the Tokyo correspondent for The San Francisco Examiner.   stories
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Southern California Pakistanis shaken by shooters’ identities
San Bernardino killers were Pakistani and Muslim – news that has devastated Pakistani Muslims in the area
Pre-dawn raid in Paris suburb unearths new 'jihadist' cell, police say
Massive firefight leaves two dead, but fate of alleged planner of Friday's attacks remains unclear
Prime-time Republican debaters spar on the issues and clash with Trump
Each of the 10 top candidates aimed to break free from the pack and take the wind out of the front-runner’s sails
Bernie Sanders spars with gun-control activist
Campaign notebook: An exchange reveals how the progressive Democrat’s gun-control views may disappoint some supporters
California gardeners struggle for work during drought
Mexican immigrants, the mainstay of residential gardening services, lose work as homeowners remove lawns to save water
Curfew rings pepper balls and tear gas, then uneasy quiet to Baltimore
Once police used pepper balls and tear gas to disperse a small crowd just after 10 p.m., the curfew seemed to hold
Activists say San Francisco trying to wash away the homeless
Pilot street-cleaning program downtown exacerbates wider Bay Area conflict over living space amid second tech boom
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Erica R. Hendry
Digital Producer/Reporter, "America Tonight."
Erica R. Hendry is a digital producer for America Tonight. She specializes in producing her own videos, multimedia and graphics to accompany her stories — and in helping reporters and producers take their on-air stories and tell them better online.  Before coming to Al Jazeera America, Hendry was a digital producer for The Diane Rehm Show, and a writer, editor and producer at Smithsonian Magazine. She also spent three years running a local, and then regional, news bureau in Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. for AOL/Patch.com.   stories
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What have we learned from 500 concussions in 3 years of college football?
In two of the last three seasons, almost half the major college football programs didn't publicly report a concussion
Meet the real-life Golden Girls
After Bonnie Moore got a divorce, she thought she’d have to give up her dream home for good. Instead, she got creative. She opened her home up to roommates, fellow baby boomers who wanted to pool resources, too. Today, she helps other older adults find roommates through Golden Girl Network, an online resource that matches roommates throughout the country. Moore, her roommates and others like them told America Tonight why more baby boomers should consider the Golden Girl lifestyle.
For many Medicaid patients, hepatitis C wonder drugs are out of reach
With the cost of pills spiking as much as 5,000 percent, state insurers struggle to pay for lifesaving treatment
No man's land: When concussions force a college football player to retire
Casey Cochran is one of at least 26 players in college football to have retired in recent years because of concussions
How one biracial student journalist is covering race protests on campus
The racially driven protests at Ithaca College this fall have rocked the upstate New York campus like few other events in the school's 123-year history. For many student journalists, covering a conflict that has made national headlines would be a dream.But for Kira Maddox, the college newspaper’s editor-in-chief, leading the coverage has come with mixed feelings. As a biracial woman, she empathizes with student protestors of color. As a journalist, she's charged with getting all sides of the story right.
Here's what students really think about race on campus
Protests about racial tensions on campus have erupted this fall at schools across the country. At the University of Missouri, two leaders were forced to resign. At Brown University, officials are putting $100 million behind a plan to create a more inclusive campus. At Ithaca College, where students and faculty are trying to remove the president, the way forward is less clear. Students opened up about how they talk about race — and what they’re taking away from the protests.
As racial tensions on campus rise, Ithaca College looks for a way forward
At Ithaca College, students say the climate on campus was tense and unwelcoming to students of color long before the protests at the University of Missouri took the national spotlight. As at Missouri, students at Ithaca say the president, Tom Rochon, can’t move the campus forward. But unlike the embattled University of Missouri president, Rochon says he’s stepping up — not stepping down.
How to help law enforcement's 'walking wounded'
One retired cop asks: Why aren’t we doing more to treat police officers with post-traumatic stress disorder?
Can a city pass its own gun reform in a politically red state?
Heidi Kendall, a volunteer with Moms Demand Action, is helping to lead a movement in Missoula, Montana, to pass universal background checks for private gun sales in the city, though the state doesn't require them.
These states have the highest gun death rates in America
Fewer gun laws mean more gun deaths, according to the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence’s annual report card.
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Evan Hill
Former Reporter
Evan Hill is a researcher and writer based in Beirut and focusing on the Middle East. He has lived in Egypt, where he reported for Foreign Policy, the Economist, the Atlantic, the Guardian, the Times, and others. As a staff writer for Al Jazeera America, he wrote about the lasting damage of America's crack cocaine laws, the fall of the Silk Road online black market, and the aftermath of Egypt's coup in 2013. His reporting in Egypt — from the Tahrir front lines to Mubarak's resignation – helped win an Online News Association award for breaking news. In Libya, he followed the revolt from the fall of Benghazi to the plight of trapped migrants in Tripoli. He helped cover the Syrian government's crackdown on dissent in 2011.   stories
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Off the grid, onto the mesa
Pajarito, N.M., is 10 miles and a world apart from downtown Albuquerque
The gas company that says it can take your backyard
Sunoco Logistics Partners invokes eminent domain to build a pipeline through Pennsylvania, setting off a legal battle
For Egypt's Sisi, winning will be easier than fixing the economy
The general needs high turnout for a mandate to push through painful economic reforms that could spur new unrest
The Mock Prison Riot: Where guards play jail
Weapons, biceps and burgers on display at the annual West Virginia event
Waiting on a Fix: Life without parole is a walking death
Raised by his grandmother, Andre Badley was seduced by the easy money made dealing crack on East Cleveland’s streets. Imprisoned in 1997 at age 24, he is now 41 years old and could spend the rest of his days behind bars while bigger dealers walk free.
The Egypt outside 'The Square'
Jehane Noujaim’s Oscar-nominated documentary revels in an idealistic portrait of the 2011 Egyptian uprising, but its sympathies for secular activists eclipse a more complicated truth.
Meeting the Prince of Blackwater
An unapologetic Erik Prince, founder of the widely criticized mercenary firm Blackwater, speaks out
The billion-dollar Bitcoin roller coaster
The virtual currency is crashing into the mainstream, but are its users ready?
FBI sting and faked death may have played key role in Silk Road demise
Curtis Green, a 47-year-old Utah resident, was a high-level administrator of the billion-dollar online black market.
In Egypt, an unhappy medium
What's fit to print after a military coup has become a dangerous question for journalists
Rage smolders on in Cairo's crucible of rebellion
Working-class Imbaba fought Mubarak and fought Morsi -- and it's not done fighting
Bloodied and bruised, Egypt's Brotherhood searches for strategy
Leaders insist peaceful protest remains the only option, even as they concede it's unlikely to reverse the coup
Many Egyptian liberals back military's crackdown
Those seeking a third way between the Muslim Brotherhood and the military are finding their political space shrinking
Egypt's Christians under attack
Copts bear the brunt of violent backlash against military crackdown
Fear of sectarian revenge grips Minya
Coptic Christians face backlash from Islamists in the wake of government crackdowns
Egypt security chiefs could have avoided bloodshed, say diplomats
Western mediators believe a compromise had been possible, but was nixed by hard-liners in Cairo
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Gregg Levine
News Editor
Gregg is National Editor for Al Jazeera America digital & editor of The Scrutineer, AJAM's news blog.   stories
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President Obama’s victory lap runs headlong into ‘hot air’
State of the Union and GOP response appear defined by heated rhetoric of Trump campaign
Amtrak completes train safety upgrade at site of deadly May derailment
Follow up on PTC series shows positive train control, which may have prevented Philadelphia accident, is still absent from most of US railroads
In post-Paris debate, Hillary Clinton gets religion
While Democrats agree on need for anti-ISIL coalition, former Secretary of State condemns ‘jihadist ideology’
What Emmanuelle Riva saw of Hiroshima
Exclusive interview with star of 'Hiroshima mon Amour' for 70th anniverary of bombing
‘Green Ramadan’ begins as pope calls for fast action on climate
Islamic holy month commences, with young activists advocating for environmental justice
Older safety technology could have prevented Amtrak tragedy
4th part of series on PTC & Amtrak derailment
Key safety system not installed at site of deadly Amtrak derailment
AJAM breaks the story on missing PTC, and changes nat’l reporting on train accident
The cruelest cut: Pastrami prices soar as cattle herds dwindle
Brisket prices have gone up 40 percent since 2013
Selma’s missing postscript
As glaring as the absence of people of color is from the Academy Awards is the absence of a bit of information from the end of the film
Obama administration still operates under Bush torture memos
The 2001 finding doesn’t have an expiration date, and there is no evidence of an Obama-era finding that directly controverts the 'Gloves Come Off' memorandum. In fact, there is evidence that the Obama administration continues to operate under that finding.
Dear police, if you can read this, you’re too close
Michael Brown, Kajieme Powell, Tamir Rice — all young, all African American, all shot dead by police. And there’s something else that binds these three — the deaths of these three — together.
For $100,000, Susan G. Komen does its bit
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, but is this the kind of awareness the disease needs?
Nuclear solutions to climate change are anything but
The president's proposed carbon rules assume nuclear power to be a clean, low-carbon energy option, and so put forth a nuclear industry Christmas list of subsidies, incentives and financial backstops that potentially funnels billions of public dollars into private industry hands and risks missing emissions targets while increasing the danger of a nuclear mishap.
Will $1 million protect you from Keith Alexander?
Nice intranet you’ve got there. Shame if something should happen to it.
More Hobby Lobby fallout: WH scrambles to correct for Wheaton
In a flurry of action at the end of the last term that started with the Hobby Lobby ruling and finished with an injunction in the case of Wheaton College, the high court significantly expanded the reach of the Religious Freedom Protection Act.
Could reparations make Memorial Day worthy of the sacrifice?
Memorial Day seen through the lens of Ta-Nehisi Coates' call for reparations
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Hashem Said
Digital Producer
Hashem Said is a digital producer for Al Jazeera America. He writes for the live news desk and monitors social media for breaking news stories. He has a background as a power user for digital websites, and works closely with the software development team to help test and improve functionality. He also enriches content on the website by creating charts and maps.  
Haya El Nasser
Reporter
Haya El Nasser is a news reporter for Al Jazeera America in Los Angeles. Previously, she was the chief demographics reporter for USA Today for 17 years. Prior to that, she was a Los Angeles-based reporter for the national newspaper, covering major stories such as the LA riots and the O.J. Simpson trial.   stories
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Building boom amid disaster: New housing springs up during Calif. drought
Despite a historic water shortage gripping the state, the need for more housing trumps the need to save water
LA Black Worker Center takes new approach to black jobs crisis
Center also trains black workers to be labor rights advocates and has become a model for other cities
California’s quest to save water may come at an ecological cost
Ecologists question rebates to replace lawns with artificial turf
California’s new water war pits landlords against tenants
Los Angeles area rent-controlled apartment building owners want tenants to pay for water as rates rise due to drought
Police killings of Latinos spark less outrage than when victims are black
Analysis: Families of Latinos killed by police push for a Brown Lives Matter movement
California communities mount protests against fracking, oil drilling
Kern County family sues California governor, charging fracking regulations discriminate against Latinos
More than 1 million Californians don’t have reliable access to clean water
Agua4All campaign brings clean water to communities that rely on groundwater laced with arsenic
Homeless veterans a year later
Some of the six vets Al Jazeera America met last year are no longer homeless, but one has died, and two have disappeared
Who counts as 'homeless' depends on how you ask
Counters in some 3,000 cities and counties across the country helped quantify the nation's homeless population this month. Yet critics warn against relying solely on this 'point-in-time' method and its underlying definition of homelessness, which could lead to undercounting. A proposed law would change the definition of homelessness and who qualifies for help.
Calif. counties cope with released prisoners, many homeless
Realignment of state corrections system shifts burden to county jails and probation departments
In dry California, water goes to those who drill the deepest
In one of the most regulated states in the nation, no laws apply to groundwater pumping, which means some people go dry
Cali water cops: What you gonna do when they come for you?
State resources officials are aggressively policing the dire shortage by imposing fines on drought rule violators
Murrieta immigration debate: Should they stay or should they go?
This small community is now a microcosm of a national humanitarian and immigration crisis
Battle of the ages: More hinges on older Latino voters come November
Whether longtime citizens or newly naturalized, Hispanics 45 or older are likely to affect the midterm elections
Evangelicals may be holy grail of Latino vote
The shift from Catholicism to more socially conservative churches is fueling a wave of activism among Hispanic voters
Latino millennials become a political force to reckon with
More Hispanic voters come of age, but wooing them won't be easy
Making a home for every homeless vet
With the largest population of homeless veterans, Los Angeles vies to meet White House goal: homes for all by 2015
Fear in the fields: Drought means job losses for California farmworkers
Thousands of workers could be laid off as land is left fallow and farm owners seek to save their businesses
Armed guards defend illegal California marijuana farms
Crime is rising in highly agricultural Central Valley as hundreds of pot plots proliferate to meet consumer demand
Sriracha becoming as American as pizza, tacos and sushi
Despite rising popularity, Asian hot sauce factory bothers California neighbors who complain of burning eyes, headaches
Arab-Americans cry foul over California high school mascot
Coachella Valley High School's Arab mascot is cause for concern among Arab-Americans
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Jayati Vora
Features Editor
Jayati Vora is a features editor for Al Jazeera America. Previously, she worked as a web editor for the media nonprofit The Nation Institute.   stories
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Revealed: The malaria crisis India doesn’t want to acknowledge
An investigation shows routine manipulation of data, shortages of supplies, understaffing and enduring dysfunction
Philly's invisible youth
The city's child welfare and emergency shelter systems continue to fail homeless kids — just as they did this reporter 17 years ago
Photo diary: Homs family finds a new home in Illinois
Amid fierce US debate over accepting Syrian refugees, one family in a Chicago suburb is grateful to be here
Blood gold: From conflict zones in Colombia to jewelry stores in the US
The trial of Colombian exporter Goldex for money laundering reveals how dirty gold reaches two American companies
Kafka in Chhattisgarh: The bureaucratization of violence in India
At ground zero of the Maoist insurgency, surrendering as a guerrilla is the only way of proving one’s innocence
Riot on a plantation
In Liberia, palm oil has set off a dangerous scramble for land
The taxi wars: Uber is ‘destroying the taxi industry’
Houston cabbies say the UberX model, with drivers who dabble, is an insult to the profession
Sack, cloth and ashes
The Children's Place CEO's 'reign of terror' has seen staff fired, activists arrested. Second story in a two-part series.
In Bangladesh, the sham of Shams Factory
Mega-chain The Children's Place continues to source clothes in unsafe sweatshops. First story in a two-part series.
A sweet deal: The royal family of cane benefits from political giving
The sugar barons of America, the Fanjul brothers, have a cozy relationship with the US government. Second story in a two-part series.
Blood, sweat and sugar: Trade deal fails Haitian workers on DR plantations
Cane cutters work overly long days for poor pay in violation of Dominican labor laws and international agreement. First story in a two-part series.
Hard trucking
Independent truckers say new safety rules threaten their livelihood
How San Antonio is solving the truancy problem
One Texas city is improving attendance while reducing the number of students facing criminal charges for missing school. Third story in a three-part series.
In the most diverse county in Texas, a big racial disparity in truancy
An in-depth look at the Dallas County courts where children as young as 12 are prosecuted as adults for truancy. Second story in a three-part series.
In Texas, courts turn truancy cases into cash
An in-depth look at the Dallas County courts where children as young as 12 are prosecuted as adults for truancy
In Texas, courts turn truancy cases into cash
An in-depth look at the Dallas County courts where children as young as 12 are prosecuted as adults for truancy. First story in a three-part series.
Lincolnpalooza
At their annual convention, Abe and Mary Todd take over small-town Illinois
Selling the Blues
To draw tourists, the Mississippi Delta plays on its musical heritage
Narendra Modi’s war on the environment
Since coming to power last year, the Indian leader has diluted ecological protections in the name of development
The ghosts of Machil
In Kashmir, a rare guilty verdict for Indian army officers who killed three local men offers hope for the future
‘Deprogramming' from the FLDS, Warren Jeffs’ secretive cult
Former FLDS followers share their stories about why they left and how they are adjusting to life on the outside. Second story in a two-part series.
Fleeing the FLDS: Followers are abandoning the notorious sect in droves
Warren Jeffs’ polygamous sect crumbles in the face of a federal lawsuit and a mass exodus. First story in a two-part series.
The hidden victims of campus sexual assault: Students with disabilities
Even Gallaudet University, designed specifically for deaf students, can get it wrong when it comes to rape
Underground Beijing
The Rat Tribe lives underneath the Chinese capital
Troubled Waters
Child brides in flood-ravaged Assam
Voting rights group challenge electoral purges
Anger at Interstate Crosscheck, the controversial program that identified 'double voters'
Are you on the Crosscheck list?
Use the search boxes below to search through Crosscheck lists from Georgia and Virginia. If your name appears on this list, you are a potential double voter. Voting twice is a felony, punishable by 2 to 10 years in prison. Guilty or not, voters whose names appear on these lists could be purged from voter rolls.
Jim Crow returns: Millions threatened by electoral purge
The computer program Interstate Crosscheck disproportionately targets minority voters
Breaking good: Preventing overdoses at concerts
Substance-testing organization the Bunk Police wants to rid music festivals of adulterated drugs
Your MLM loves you
Cherry-picking from the scriptures helps recruits believe the unbelievable. Third story in a three-part series.
Seeing green with Herbalife
In a working-class immigrant neighborhood in Queens, N.Y., there are plenty of Herbalife believers with small bank accounts but big American dreams. Second story in a three-part series.
Vemma's army of young recruits
Students dream of cash and cars, but get a rude awakening. First story in a three-part series.
‘Bob’s Burgers’ animates a struggling mom-and-pop shop
Not since ‘Roseanne’ has TV had a better portrait of the working-class family
Mutant fish in the Susquehanna River
Smallmouth bass with grotesque open sores have been discovered in Pennsylvania’s sick waterway
A Lazarus drug goes mainstream in the heroin war
In Georgia, race of overdose victims may be a factor in new legislation expanding access to naloxone
Sentenced young: The story of life without parole for juvenile offenders
Nationwide, at least 1,200 people serve life without parole for crimes they committed as children. Beth Schwartzapfel on America’s juvenile lifers.
Can parents accused of neglect redeem one another?
Parent peer advocacy gains institutional footing in New York City’s child welfare system
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Jessica Loudis
Features editor
Jessica Loudis is an online features editor. She has worked as a news writer at Slate, an associate editor at Bookforum magazine, a senior features editor at T, The New York Times style magazine, and edited the essay collection Should I Go to Grad School? which was published by Bloomsbury in 2014.   stories
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Can a new victims advocacy movement break cycles of violence?
A growing number of organizations are calling for shorter sentences for offenders and better counseling for victims
Food allergies on a budget
Researchers who examined data from the 2011 and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys found that more than 20 percent of children with food allergies experienced food insecurity. AJAM wrote about one family with food allergies and how one food pantry in Kansas City is hoping to help others like them.
Up close and personnel: Neither workers nor bosses, human resources professionals straddle two worlds
The neglected back-office world of HR
In Ireland, abortion debate takes center stage
Once a taboo subject, abortion – and the ban on it – is fast becoming a major issue in the run-up to Irish elections
In the jungle, FARC rebels prepare for peace
As Colombia's 51-year conflict winds down, Al Jazeera gets exclusive access to a guerrilla unit
Grim prospects for sustainable miners in Peru
Small-scale miners are being aggressively targeted in a government crackdown on illegal gold mining
A Los Angeles poet's revolution of everyday life
As gentrification sweeps the city, Sesshu Foster has quietly become the poet laureate of a vanishing neighborhood
Mexican journalist seeks answers after attack
Karla Silva was beaten at the Heraldo newspaper office in central Mexico last year. Did the mayor of her town order the assault?
In Turkey, women's issues gain visibility
Gender equality is becoming a charged political issue, but differences among advocates run deeper than party lines
In Burkina Faso, a mansion offers a glimpse into the revolution
In the wake of the government's ouster, citizens transformed the home of the deposed president's brother into a museum
Bolivia struggles with gender-based violence
The death of María Isabel Pillco illustrates how far the country has to go in changing a culture of domestic abuse
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Joanna S. Kao
Multimedia Reporter/Interactive Developer
Joanna S. Kao is a multimedia reporter and interactive developer who covers veterans issues, immigration and homelessness at Al Jazeera America. She also creates immersive longform story templates for the newsroom, experiments with audio storytelling and explores theater-related data in her spare time. She has a bachelors degree in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and enjoys living at the intersection of computer science, design and journalism.   stories
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Food allergies on a budget
Researchers who examined data from the 2011 and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys found that more than 20 percent of children with food allergies experienced food insecurity. AJAM wrote about one family with food allergies and how one food pantry in Kansas City is hoping to help others like them.
GOP debate finalists chosen, with questions over methodology
Al Jazeera calculated top 10 lists for every combination of five poll result subsets drawn from nonpartisan phone surveys reported on Pollster.com from June and July 2015 and calculated the number of times each candidate made the top 10, on the basis of each combination of polls. Explore how the choice of five polls and method of averaging can affect the top 10 ranking.
Loving Across the Border
Vivian de Leon, a 21-year-old nursing student, is one of more than 660,000 people covered under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and one of 5.5 million people in the U.S. with at least one undocumented parent. More than 275,000 parents with U.S.-born children were deported from 2011 to 2013. De Leon and her dad, who was deported to Guatemala in 2011, have lived apart for nearly half her life.
Good enough to fight for the US but missing the mark for citizenship
More than 7,200 members of the military have been caught between two sets of standards: one for military enlistment, another for becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen. The difference means they find themselves unable to become citizens of a country for which they are willing to die. More than a third were turned down because of moral character, according to records obtained through a FOIA request.
Finding a place to stay
Across the country, homeless people struggle to find places to sit, sleep and pass time. Interviews with a dozen homeless and formerly homeless people illustrate the sorts of daily challenges people on the streets face. In this award-winning multimedia project, listen to the homeless and formerly homeless as they walk through their day and describe those challenges.
Who counts as 'homeless' depends on how you ask
Counters in some 3,000 cities and counties across the country helped quantify the nation's homeless population this month. Yet critics warn against relying solely on this 'point-in-time' method and its underlying definition of homelessness, which could lead to undercounting. A proposed law would change the definition of homelessness and who qualifies for help.
Who really runs Washington?
A lot of money is at play in politics, but whom do your elected officials really represent? Fundraising occupies a huge portion of politicians' time, and lobbyists pay huge sums to be in the same room as policymakers. What does that money buy? And what is your role in the political economy? Watch a personalized video about the influence of money in politics.
Deported vets: Life in ‘the bunker’
Hector Barajas and the veterans staying with him are establishing a new life in Tijuana — a life after deportation. Their stories are similar: Each was honorably discharged from the military, but was later charged with a deportable offense — for example, drug possession, discharge of a firearm or perjury. Most have spent the vast majority of their lives in the United States and are now starting over in a country they barely know.
Woman Warrior
Mitchelene Big Man turns to traditional dance to heal the pains of life and war
Rocking the symphony
Young black musicians change the face of classical music
What's in a name? An audio-visual exploration of names and identity.
In this exploration of identity, Al Jazeera interviewed individuals about their name and meaning. For some, their name represents who they are at different stages of life, and for others, their name is what makes them unique.
How responsible are online services with your passwords?
Each time we create a user account, we place our trust in a company's security protocols to protect the username, password and other personal data required to create the account. Al Jazeera contacted over 40 companies from a variety of industries to find out how they store passwords.
123456 and other things that shouldn't be your password
The Adobe data breach of personal information from 150 million user accounts shows just how vulnerable consumers are when signing up for an online account. The data also reveals just how careless many users are in choosing their account settings, which makes not just themselves, but also others in the database, vulnerable to identity fraud.
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Joe Rivera
Digital Video Producer
Joe Rivera is an award winning journalist, who possesses the rare skill set of being able to produce, develop, write in-studio content, tech-manage live shows and create eye-catching content online. He has been part of multiple network and cable show launches in his 20-plus years in television.  
Joseph Auriemma
Producer, Digital Media
Joe Auriemma is an award-winning television producer with strong digital credentials. He has a versatile background with a commitment towards product perfection in all media platforms.   stories
Out on the field: Former NFL player Wade Davis opens up
In an extended interview, Davis talks about his struggle to come out and the joy he feels helping LGBTQ youth
Jyoti Thottam
News Editor
Jyoti Thottam is a writer and editor at Al Jazeera America and a member of the adjunct faculty at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. She joined Al Jazeera after 13 years as a writer and editor at Time magazine, including four years as South Asia Bureau chief based in New Delhi. She has reported from seven South Asian countries and covered the conflicts in Sri Lanka and Kashmir and the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, for which she won the Luce Award for reporting, Time Inc.’s highest honor. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Village Voice, Bookforum and the Believer.   stories
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Parents of foreign fighters accuse Belgian police of inaction
Federal prosecutor demands maximum sentence for alleged recruiter for armed groups in Syria
‘We are excelling in every field’: Black students rebuff Justice Scalia
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's remarks about African-Americans and higher education cause pain and anger on campus
Gun companies lock up billions in sales, boosted by calls for tougher laws
Almost half the guns made in the US are produced by three companies: Smith & Wesson, Freedom Group and Sturm, Ruger
Syrian refugees in Paris fear backlash after attacks
‘They left their country because of war and found it here again,’ activist says of those who fled ISIL and civil war
Missouri state senator aims to block student's dissertation on abortion
Exclusive interview: Missouri doctoral student defends research on how state's required abortion wait affects women
Residents in ISIL's Syrian capital fear military conscription
ISIL has reportedly ordered all males aged 15 and older to register their names and addresses with police in Raqqa
European ministers consider offshoring refugee reception centers
While idea might pre-empt need for dangerous travel, experts warn plan should not undermine legal protections
Cuba's isolated act of faith
As Pope Francis visits the island, remote town builds the first new Catholic church since the revolution
With tear gas and razor wire, EU countries skirt international refugee law
Human rights experts question Europe’s heavy-handed approach to growing refugee crisis
Mayor’s body headed for topless bar? De Blasio vs. Times Square nudity
NYC task force seeking way to ban semi-naked women from working in Times Square, once home to peep shows galore
A new way to treat women's health in prison
A program for violent offenders at California's largest women-only prison
Black Lives Matter disrupts Martin O’Malley, Bernie Sanders event
Protesters at Netroots event demand ‘a concrete plan’ for stopping black deaths at the hands of police
Hiroshima: The great taboo
Analysis: The US has struggled to accept the legacy of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki into its collective memory
Jordan's craft brewery brings beer back to its birthplace
Yazan Karadsheh, the founder of Carakale brewery, is on a mission to create a craft beer culture in Jordan
Iceland’s medical system under strain from all sides
Understaffing, budget shortages and rumors of privatization haunt the small country’s hospitals
Class war comes to Iceland
Iceland's banks are recovering, but the middle class is angry and demanding change, with thousands on strike
Foreign fighters come home to roost in Jordan
Jordan locks up every disillusioned fighter who returns from Syria, but critics say prison will radicalize them further
How San Antonio is solving the truancy problem
One Texas city is improving attendance while reducing the number of students facing criminal charges for missing school. Third story in a three-part series.
In the most diverse county in Texas, a big racial disparity in truancy
An in-depth look at the Dallas County courts where children as young as 12 are prosecuted as adults for truancy. Second story in a three-part series.
In Texas, courts turn truancy cases into cash
An in-depth look at the Dallas County courts where children as young as 12 are prosecuted as adults for truancy
In Texas, courts turn truancy cases into cash
An in-depth look at the Dallas County courts where children as young as 12 are prosecuted as adults for truancy. First story in a three-part series.
Singapore's founding father, Lee Kuan Yew, dies at 91
Lee's use of authoritarian 'Asian values' in government widely credited by Singapore's success, eyed by other leaders
The ghosts of Machil
In Kashmir, a rare guilty verdict for Indian army officers who killed three local men offers hope for the future
Spy cables reveal Sri Lanka hyped up Tamil Tiger postwar threat
Exclusive: Sri Lanka played up concerns of LTTE regrouping in South Africa despite contrary intelligence report
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Kate Kilpatrick
Planning Editor/Reporter
Kate Kilpatrick is an award-winning reporter, editor and interactive storyteller with 17 years experience in startup, digital and legacy media spanning newspapers, magazines, radio, TV/cable and online news sites.   stories
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Nearly a quarter of Philadelphia’s adult population lacks basic literacy
In part 2 of our ‘America left behind’ series, Al Jazeera explores the vicious cycle of poverty and lack of education
Remembering Ayotzinapa
Families of the 43 missing Mexican students reflect on an agonizing year
Child obesity in Mexico
US sends its supersized diet to kids south of the border
Homeless, drug-addicted more vulnerable amid Puerto Rico debt crisis
On tough San Juan streets, city’s most marginalized residents eke out living in precarious underground economy
Titanic canal project divides Nicaragua
Critics say world's largest-ever engineering endeavor marks new era of colonization
Nicaragua Canal ‘will destroy we’
Indigenous and Afro-Caribbeans worry $50 billion mega-project will be final blow to language and communal life
A promise yet to be delivered in West Philadelphia
A year after President Obama announced the high-poverty priority zone, residents are waiting to see results
Turning Mexico’s kingpins into cartelitos
Drug trafficking organizations are rapidly splintering, but there’s no end in sight to the violence
Seeing green with Herbalife
In a working-class immigrant neighborhood in Queens, N.Y., there are plenty of Herbalife believers with small bank accounts but big American dreams
Treasured Island
The people of Tangier fear their life, land and heritage could wash away
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Katherine Lanpher
Features Editor
Katherine Lanpher is the Senior Online Features Editor for Al Jazeera America in New York, where she manages a staff of three editors, two staff writers and scores of freelance writers around the globe, producing daily features and long-term projects and investigations, many of them multimedia projects with audio. Awards include a Sigma Delta Chi, a Gracie and an IVOH. She is a past host of "America Abroad,'' a monthly documentary on foreign policy issues distributed by PRI/NPR Worldwide and heard on 200 stations domestically, with nearly a million listeners on the rest of the globe.   stories
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Selling American Girls
Sex trafficking of minors in the US
Selling American Girls
Sex trafficking in the US
The United States of bus travel
The people you meet in this country are a trip
The United States of Bus Travel
A view of America from the seat of a Greyhound bus
Child obesity in Mexico
US sends its supersized diet to kids south of the border
Bringing up the bodies
One woman's search for remains in the Bakken oil fields
Lincolnpalooza
At their annual convention, Abe and Mary Todd take over small-town Illinois
Canada's wild fur trade returns
From trapline to showroom, an industry that birthed a nation sees a resurgence
Priestess dreams
At 18, she's determined to make her way out
Miss Muslimah
Miss Muslimah beauty pageant
Bear Town USA
Bears invade Kaktovik, Alaska
Woman Warrior
Mitchelene Big Man turns to traditional dance to heal the pains of life and war
The World Cup of Food
The only thing people argue about more than soccer is food
Treasured Island
The people of Tangier fear their life, land and heritage could wash away
Making a home for every homeless vet
With the largest population of homeless veterans, Los Angeles vies to meet White House goal: homes for all by 2015
Radio on the Reservation
Native Americans tune into an old-fashioned technology that keeps languages — and communities — alive
Looking for love in wide-open spaces, the dating dilemma of gay Navajo
LGBT tribe members face obstacles of distance on the reservation, yet dating apps and bars don’t appeal
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Kathryn Wheeler
Digital Producer, "America Tonight"
Kathryn Wheeler is a digital producer with "America Tonight", where she brings the team’s stories and on-air packages to its audience online. She came to Al Jazeera America by way of Al Jazeera English, where she was production coordinator for shows and documentaries. Kathryn transitioned into journalism from a career in human rights and humanitarian assistance. She obtained an MSc in International Development from SOAS, University of London and a BA from Bryn Mawr College.   stories
What have we learned from 500 concussions in 3 years of college football?
In two of the last three seasons, almost half the major college football programs didn't publicly report a concussion
No man's land: When concussions force a college football player to retire
Casey Cochran is one of at least 26 players in college football to have retired in recent years because of concussions
Lam Thuy Vo
Former Interactive Editor and Reporter
Lam Thuy Vo was the Interactive Editor at Al Jazeera America where she headed a team of coder-journalists and covered poverty-related stories.   stories
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Food allergies on a budget
Researchers who examined data from the 2011 and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys found that more than 20 percent of children with food allergies experienced food insecurity. AJAM wrote about one family with food allergies and how one food pantry in Kansas City is hoping to help others like them.
Life after Michael Brown and Freddie Gray
Two photographers, one from Ferguson and one from Baltimore, interpret life in their communities one year after the deaths of Michael Brown and Freddie Gray. Collaborating with @echosight, AJAM combined photographs from each photographer into a single, unified visual statement. Together these images tell a story that is more than just the sum of its parts.
Loving Across the Border
Vivian de Leon, a 21-year-old nursing student, is one of more than 660,000 people covered under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and one of 5.5 million people in the U.S. with at least one undocumented parent. More than 275,000 parents with U.S.-born children were deported from 2011 to 2013. De Leon and her dad, who was deported to Guatemala in 2011, have lived apart for nearly half her life.
The Umbrella Network
When pro-democracy protests began in his hometown, Hong Kong, Jeffrey Ngo, a New York University student originally from Hong Kong, felt compelled to act. This is the story of his involvement in a global protest movement.
Good enough to fight for the US but missing the mark for citizenship
More than 7,200 members of the military have been caught between two sets of standards: one for military enlistment, another for becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen. The difference means they find themselves unable to become citizens of a country for which they are willing to die. More than a third were turned down because of moral character, according to records obtained through a FOIA request.
Baltimore: The divided city where Freddie Gray lived and died
The protests in Baltimore aren’t just about Freddie Gray's death and police brutality. They're about the racialized poverty and dearth of opportunity in parts of the city, such as the Sandtown neighborhood where Gray grew up. The numbers tell some of that tale: The city's median household income is well under the Maryland average, the number of abandoned houses swelled in the past decades and the city's public schools are 'hypersegregated' by race.
Signed, sealed, delivered
During the Vietnam War, a teenager saw violence, prostitution and heroin addiction take hold of his city, and he saw his friends go to war and die. With his country in turmoil, he knew he had to leave. He decided to start a new life in Germany. What he didn”t factor in was that he”d fall for a girl back home in Saigon. Watch a video about a Vietnam War story documented in nine years of love letters.
Finding a place to stay
Across the country, homeless people struggle to find places to sit, sleep and pass time. Interviews with a dozen homeless and formerly homeless people illustrate the sorts of daily challenges people on the streets face. In this award-winning multimedia project, listen to the homeless and formerly homeless as they walk through their day and describe those challenges.
Launched to great expectations, Dickens theme park falls on hard times
Dickens World is a theme park that aims to bring to life Charles Dickens”s Victorian England and educate visitors about poverty”s hardships. But as fate would have it, Dickens World has fallen on hard times. Few people, it seems, want to experience poverty through a theme park.
Terms of Service
In a comic format, AJAM presents a graphic novella about Big Data, privacy and the future of sharing.
Who really runs Washington?
A lot of money is at play in politics, but whom do your elected officials really represent? Fundraising occupies a huge portion of politicians' time, and lobbyists pay huge sums to be in the same room as policymakers. What does that money buy? And what is your role in the political economy? Watch a personalized video about the influence of money in politics.
Deported vets: Life in ‘the bunker’
Hector Barajas and the veterans staying with him are establishing a new life in Tijuana — a life after deportation. Their stories are similar: Each was honorably discharged from the military, but was later charged with a deportable offense — for example, drug possession, discharge of a firearm or perjury. Most have spent the vast majority of their lives in the United States and are now starting over in a country they barely know.
Woman Warrior
Mitchelene Big Man turns to traditional dance to heal the pains of life and war
Ebola's toll on West Africa
Thousands of people have contracted Ebola since the mid-1970s, but this year”s outbreak is the largest on record. Explore current and past outbreaks in West Africa in this interactive.
In between in California
This collection of multimedia stories provides a snapshot of Californians living above the poverty level but still struggling. Meet five California households that earn too much to receive most government benefits yet too little to reliably make ends meet and are part of a growing in-between.
Getting by
Some 50 million Americans live below the official poverty line, and millions more are barely making ends meet. This photo series and community project explores how people try to survive.
What's in a name? An audio-visual exploration of names and identity.
In this exploration of identity, Al Jazeera interviewed individuals about their name and meaning. For some, their name represents who they are at different stages of life, and for others, their name is what makes them unique.
How responsible are online services with your passwords?
Each time we create a user account, we place our trust in a company's security protocols to protect the username, password and other personal data required to create the account. Al Jazeera contacted over 40 companies from a variety of industries to find out how they store passwords.
123456 and other things that shouldn't be your password
The Adobe data breach of personal information from 150 million user accounts shows just how vulnerable consumers are when signing up for an online account. The data also reveals just how careless many users are in choosing their account settings, which makes not just themselves, but also others in the database, vulnerable to identity fraud.
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Lan Trinh
Senior Digital Video Producer
Lan Trinh is a Peabody Award-winning multilingual producer/journalist with substantial experience in news, documentaries and entertainment for network TV and web in the U.S. and Asia, including CNN, ABC News and PBS.   stories
The Many Faces of Mao Zedong
Chinese artist in New York Zhang Hongtu makes whimsical and satirical depictions of Mao. But this art can only be seen outside of China.
Myrtle Beach Lures Chinese Golfers
Jinping's anti-corruption drive in China closed at least 100 golf courses, leaving many to search for places to play
Lisa De Bode
Reporter
Lisa De Bode is a reporter for Al Jazeera America, where she writes about inequality, public health, gender, foreign fighters and European affairs.   stories
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World's largest 'tax-funded mass grave' might be turned into a park
NY City Council discusses turning Hart Island, where more 1 million poor and unclaimed people are buried, into a park
Parents of foreign fighters accuse Belgian police of inaction
Federal prosecutor demands maximum sentence for alleged recruiter for armed groups in Syria
16 detained in Belgium as Brussels stays on high alert
Paris fugitive Salah Abdeslam was not among those detained during 22 overnight raids, Belgian authorities said Monday
European ministers consider offshoring refugee reception centers
While idea might pre-empt need for dangerous travel, experts warn plan should not undermine legal protections
With tear gas and razor wire, EU countries skirt international refugee law
Human rights experts question Europe’s heavy-handed approach to growing refugee crisis
Spousal abuse: the 'silent illness' driving women into homelessness
Doctors called on to better observe guidelines on screening women for violence, a leading cause of homelessness
Mothers of Intervention
After recruiters lured their sons, grieving parents take to the frontlines of anti-radicalism
Hygiene and Heartache: Homeless women's daily struggle to keep clean
For many homeless women, administering self-care on the streets is a time-consuming and dangerous endeavor
Woman Warrior
Mitchelene Big Man turns to traditional dance to heal the pains of life and war
Funding cuts may leave NYC vulnerable to tuberculosois
‘Forgotten’ disease continues to hit poorest immigrants as prevention resources drop and clinics close
Trapped in a Nightmare
As the Central African Republic falls into barbaric violence between the country's Christians and Muslims, 23,000 refugees — traumatized, malnourished and dying — remain stuck in the town of Boda
Radical nun says answering her Christian calling landed her in prison
83-year-old Sister Megan Rice continues her anti-nuclear activism in jail, pleads for a Catholic Church 'of the streets'
Ms. Veteran America: Healing in Heels
More than just a pageant for skinny girls, contestants say, it's a chance to raise awareness about homeless veterans
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Maia Davis
News Editor
Maia Davis is a news editor with extensive experience editing and writing news articles and opinion pieces with a focus on politics, government, education and health. She was previously an editorial writer and reporter at The Bergen Record and a reporter at the Los Angeles Times and the Patriot-Ledger. She has won awards for her coverage of the health of racial minorities and education.   stories
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In warming ocean, record number of seals and sea lions sicken and starve
Ailing or dead seals and sea lions washed up on California beaches in record numbers in 2015; this year could be worse
The growing potential of energy-efficient pot farms
Cannabis industry is a heavy energy user but has potential to go green with the right technology and incentives
Biggest El Niño effects on US may be yet to come
NASA scientists say weather pattern hasn’t peaked yet, worst impact in US to be seen in next several months
DNC restores Sanders’ access to voter data as candidates prepare to debate
Democratic National Committee acted hours after Sanders’ campaign filed suit; will conflict boost audience for debate?
In post-Paris debate, Hillary Clinton gets religion
While Democrats agree on need for anti-ISIL coalition, former Secretary of State condemns ‘jihadist ideology’
In wake of attacks, Parisians ask, Why here?
The latest assaults in Paris, Europe’s worst since 2004, leave residents asking why their city was targeted again
Are Guantánamo prisoners really the worst of the worst?
Total of 49 detainees not cleared for release – but also not charged with crimes
A California crab ban reveals trouble in the Pacific Ocean
Crab fishing is delayed, and poisoned sea lions are washing ashore, with toxic algae to blame
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Marisa Taylor
Reporter
Marisa Taylor is a reporter for Al Jazeera America in New York, where she has covered public health, science, LGBT- and gender-related stories since 2013. She previously worked as a technology blogger and columnist at The Wall Street Journal, where she also reported for “What They Know,” the Gerald Loeb Award-winning investigative series about online privacy. Her work has appeared in Mother Jones, SmartMoney, MSNBC.com, ABCNews.com and others. She earned an M.S. in magazine writing at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, where her master's thesis about LGBT domestic violence was awarded with honors, and a B.A. in psychology from Stanford University.   stories
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What it's like to volunteer as an escort at an abortion clinic
Profile of Brock Wilbur, an LA comedian, and his experiences as an abortion clinic volunteer
A new way to treat women's health in prison
A program for violent offenders at California's largest women-only prison
San Francisco debates controversial mental health law
SF city supervisors debate Laura's Law, which mandates involuntary outpatient psychiatry treatment
The growing trend of transgender 'bathroom bully' bills
Analysis of proposed laws to bar trans students from using bathrooms matching gender identities
Ellen Pao is a 'Rosa Parks' for women in Silicon Valley
News analysis of the sexual harassment claims against VC firm Kleiner Perks
Texas abortion clinics: How far is too far to drive?
Federal appeals court will hear arguments on state's abortion law, which could limit women's options across the state
How the neurobiology of trauma affects rape accusations
A look at how the brain processes memories when experiencing a traumatic event like rape
Women on corporate boards help companies strike better deals
Analysis of research on gender quotas for corporate boards
Trans homicides surpass total for 2015 as community warns of crisis
Tally of anti-trans homicides reaches 13 by August 2015, more than all of 2014
Monica Lewinsky's return and the sexism 2.0 of political scandals
Analysis of backlash against Monica Lewinsky's Vanity Fair article
Drivers accuse car app Uber of dictating terms, skimming tips
Uber drivers file class action lawsuit in California
UC Berkeley's sexual assault problem
Cal students accuse university of botching sexual assault investigations
Photos: Fast food strike in Manhattan
Workers in New York take part in a nationwide effort to raise wages
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Mark Rykoff
Photo Editor
Mark Rykoff has over 30 years of experience in the photo industry. In the digital era, he has brought the storytelling power of photography to the countless possibilities presented by the internet and tablet-based technologies. Before working at Al Jazeera America, he spent most of his career at TIME magazine, working in the field (in the Moscow bureau) and at the magazine headquarters in New York. Among the many awards he has received is a News and Documentary Emmy, in 2009, for a series of videos about the stories behind iconic photos.   stories
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Selling American Girls
Sex trafficking in the US
The United States of Bus Travel
A view of America from the seat of a Greyhound bus
Riot on a plantation
In Liberia, palm oil has set off a dangerous scramble for land
Remembering Ayotzinapa
Families of the 43 missing Mexican students reflect on an agonizing year
Child obesity in Mexico
US sends its supersized diet to kids south of the border
Hard trucking
Independent truckers say new safety rules threaten their livelihood
Amazon tribes fight against $9 billion dam
The Munduruku tribe fights a gigantic government project
Lincolnpalooza
At their annual convention, Abe and Mary Todd take over small-town Illinois
Selling the Blues
Mississippi tries to capitalize on its role in the birth of the blues
Nicaragua Canal ‘will destroy we’
Indigenous and Afro-Caribbeans worry $50 billion mega-project will be final blow to language and communal life
Underground Beijing
The Rat Tribe lives underneath the Chinese capital
Troubled Waters
Child brides in flood-ravaged Assam
Miss Muslimah
Miss Muslimah beauty pageant
Reunited in Rwanda
Two sisters lost in the Rwandan diaspora find their way home
In Nigeria, from marriage to murder
A 14-year old kills the man she was forced to marry
Bear Town USA
Bears invade Kaktovik, Alaska
Ms. Veteran America: Healing in Heels
More than just a pageant for skinny girls, contestants say, it's a chance to raise awareness about homeless veterans
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Massoud Hayoun
Reporter
Massoud Hayoun is a reporter who writes about U.S., Chinese, North African and European affairs. Previously, he wrote for AFP, The Atlantic, South China Morning Post and others.   stories
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Missouri state senator aims to block student's dissertation on abortion
Exclusive interview: Missouri doctoral student defends research on how state's required abortion wait affects women
Did a Chinese mogul beat a Treasury Dept. ban on doing business in the US?
Records reveal NYC building is owned by company linked to man blacklisted for allegedly funding African dictators
Perry met with ‘suspicious’ Chinese tycoons behind Texas methanol plant
New documents reveal that the ex-Texas governor had dinner with Chinese officials seeking to park their money abroad
Oklahoma halts all executions after lethal injection drug shipment mix-up
State officials refuse to name company that sent wrong drug hours before scheduled execution of Richard Glossip
What Emmanuelle Riva saw of Hiroshima
Exclusive interview with star of 'Hiroshima mon Amour' for 70th anniverary of bombing
China’s Texas Hold ’em: Chemical plants flank historic black community
Neighborhood already home to many energy projects fears potential effects of proposed giant methanol plant
China’s Texas Hold ’em: Rick Perry and a Chinese plant on the Gulf
Al Jazeera investigates US and Chinese interests behind bid for $4.5B methanol plant in an underserved black community
The billionaire behind the canal
Wang Jing's megaproject furthers China's aims in Latin America and deflates economic importance of Hong Kong
A death delayed: Rodney Reed now eyes exoneration, end to ‘racist’ justice
On eve of his scheduled execution – now stayed – condemned man speaks to Al Jazeera on his case and the justice system
China’s Louisiana Purchase: Environmental concerns in ‘Cancer Alley’
Chinese company behind methanol plant in mostly black Louisiana town has come under fire for shirking health laws
China’s Louisiana Purchase: Who’s building a methanol plant on the bayou?
Al Jazeera investigates ties between Louisiana and the Chinese government in a proposed $1.85 billion methanol plant
After steel's fall, Christmas puts food on tables in America’s Bethlehem
Local opinion divided on the end of a production-driven economy
For the roots of Salem witch hysteria, look at the next town over
Some descendants of accused witches in Danvers, once called Salem Village, say they are ready to address their legacy
Rapper’s arrest highlights Morocco ‘politics of revenge,’ activists say
El-Haqed faces criminal charges that supporters say were fabricated to punish him for his political beliefs
Activists say San Francisco trying to wash away the homeless
Pilot street-cleaning program downtown exacerbates wider Bay Area conflict over living space amid second tech boom
Decades after internment, Japanese-Americans warn of what’s still possible
As they mark Day of Remembrance, former detainees say talk of national security can still trump Americans’ basic rights
Looking for love in wide-open spaces, the dating dilemma of gay Navajo
LGBT tribe members face obstacles of distance on the reservation, yet dating apps and bars don’t appeal
Rock legend Lou Reed, as remembered by downtown Manhattan
New York mourns a man who embodied the city's grit, style and uncompromising cool
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Matt Williams
News Editor
Matt Williams is a news editor. Prior to working at Al Jazeera America he was weekend editor at the Guardian US during the era of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Edward Snowden/NSA stories. The move to news editing followed more than a decade as a reporter based in London, New York and Singapore for Press Association, the Guardian, The Scotsman and others.   stories
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America’s new militia movement: Patriot groups explode under Obama
Occupation of Oregon federal facility highlights growth in armed anti-government groups
Let it bee: Rise of urban apiaries has New York City buzzing
Since 2010, legions of honeybees have taken over the backyards and rooftops of New York City
San Francisco moves to cover diaper costs for low-income families
City officials plans to spend about $479,000 annually to distribute diapers monthly to families in need
Forces look to mom-friendly policies to combat US women’s military fatigue
While the military is developing generous maternity packages, the country as a whole has no law mandating paid time off
US policy shift threatens Cuban loyalty to the revolution
John Kerry's Havana visit caps a seismic shift from hostile policy that helped prop up Fidel and Raúl Castro
Spousal abuse: the 'silent illness' driving women into homelessness
Doctors called on to better observe guidelines on screening women for violence, a leading cause of homelessness
The taxing problem of bringing up baby on meager wages
With sales tax on basic needs and complicated credits, low-income parents are hit hard by the cost of rearing
Diaper banks provide relief for struggling parents, starting at the bottom
Almost a third of families say they lack the diapers they need; network of nonprofits tries to fill that gap
Mothers of Intervention
After recruiters lured their sons, grieving parents take to the frontlines of anti-radicalism
First ocean cleaning system to be deployed in 2016
World's first ocean system targeting plastic pollution to launch in 2016
Reporters losing war zone protection as fighters post propaganda online
Journalists have become targets for kidnappings and killings like never before, AP chief said, calling for new war-crime law
The Homeless Way of Death: Frozen to the floor, no money for a funeral
Harvey Dell Harmon Jr., homeless in Chicago, died of cold this winter. To family and friends, he was no John Doe
Dominican Republic activists vow to stop mine
Dominican activists call mining projects new form of colonialism
Hygiene and Heartache: Homeless women's daily struggle to keep clean
For many homeless women, administering self-care on the streets is a time-consuming and dangerous endeavor
Aftermath of a shooting
One Chicago family's experience in a city scarred by gun crime
Northern Ireland hears echo of itself in Israel Palestinian conflict
Graffiti show how some affected by the Irish conflict see reflections of Northern Ireland in Gaza
Funding cuts may leave NYC vulnerable to tuberculosois
‘Forgotten’ disease continues to hit poorest immigrants as prevention resources drop and clinics close
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Michael Keller
Former Multimedia Reporter/Interactive Developer
Michael was on the Interactive Multimedia team at Al Jazeera where he reported, designed and programmed interactive projects on a mix of breaking news and issues around technology, privacy and surveillance. He has a Masters in journalism from the Columbia Journalism School and graduated Magna Cum Laude with a BA in Comparative Literature and Psychology from Georgetown University, Phi Beta Kappa.   stories
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Losing the fight against Big Data
California’s formerly strong stance on consumer protection is being stifled by the tech lobby and electoral changes
Fare Game: Taking the rating economy for a ride
Consumers are used to rating products on their quality, but in the digital economy, the customer is often rated as well. Want to take a vacation? Make sure your Airbnb reputation is good. Want to get a car home at night? Check your Uber score. How do these systems change our behavior? Whom do they help, and whom could they hurt? In this graphic short, we investigate how this developing economy is playing out.
Derailed Amtrak train sped into deadly crash curve
Al Jazeera America was the first to report the train”s last recorded speed of 106 mph. That was significantly faster than other trains passing through the same curve in the past two and a half months, according to an Al Jazeera America analysis. While 45 other trains traveled above 50 mph in the curve, only one was above 55 mph: Amtrak 180, a train traveling at 55.5 mph on May 8th from Washington D.C. to New York”s Penn Station.
Baltimore: The divided city where Freddie Gray lived and died
The protests in Baltimore aren’t just about Freddie Gray's death and police brutality. They're about the racialized poverty and dearth of opportunity in parts of the city, such as the Sandtown neighborhood where Gray grew up. The numbers tell some of that tale: The city's median household income is well under the Maryland average, the number of abandoned houses swelled in the past decades and the city's public schools are 'hypersegregated' by race.
Texas abortion clinics: How far is too far to drive?
Federal appeals court will hear arguments on state's abortion law, which could limit women's options across the state
To catch a breach: How much do data breach notification laws protect?
Forty-seven states require companies to notify customers that their data has been stolen but they vary widely but what data they cover. Iowa, for instance, requires companies to notify you if your fingerprint is stolen _ Texas if thieves steal your date of birth. How does your state compare?
Terms of Service
In a comic format, AJAM presents a graphic novella about Big Data, privacy and the future of sharing.
Voting's 'impending crisis'
With US voting machines aging, states have few funds to replace them and vendors are putting little new on the market. On Election Day, these problems could translate into hours-long waits, lost votes and errors in election results. In the long term, such problems breed a lack of trust in the democratic process, reducing the public's faith in government, experts say.
Ebola's toll on West Africa
Thousands of people have contracted Ebola since the mid-1970s, but this year”s outbreak is the largest on record. Explore current and past outbreaks in West Africa in this interactive.
Where would 7 million displaced Syrians fit?
Since the start of the Syrian conflict in 2011, at least two million refugees have fled the country and more than five million have been displaced internally. But what does 7 million people look like? Using U.S. Census data, this interactive shows where 7 million people live in your area to illustrate the scope of this regional humanitarian crisis.
The politicization of the debt ceiling, in one chart
The requirement of congressional approval for the U.S. Treasury to raise the total amount the government is permitted to borrow has become the focus of a bitter political clash between the Obama administration and the GOP over spending priorities. This chart demonstrates how a once-routine act of Congress has become a 'political weapon,' according to Louis Fisher, who focused on the separation of powers during his more than three decades at the Congressional Research Service.
A guide to hunger strikes at Guantanamo Bay
For the past seven months, detainees at Guantanamo Bay detention camp have been on hunger strike protesting, in part, their indefinite detention and alleged mistreatment. Although this action has been one of the most widely publicized, it's certainly not the first. Hunger strikes started almost immediately after the camp was opened 11 years ago and have continued regularly since then. This timeline documents the evolving role of hunger strikes as a form of protest.
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Michael Pizzi
Reporter
Michael Pizzi is a reporter for Al Jazeera America, where he writes about the Middle East, foreign policy, refugee crises and Internet policy. He reported for AJAM from Jordan and from Paris in the aftermath of the November terror attacks. He previously worked as a reporter and translator in Jordan, covering the Syrian war and its spillover, and at a digital rights organization in Lebanon. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Daily Beast, USA Today and others.   stories
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As US politicians protest, security officials brush off refugee 'hysteria'
At Halifax security forum, military officials and security experts say blocking refugees carries its own risks
Syrian refugees in Paris fear backlash after attacks
‘They left their country because of war and found it here again,’ activist says of those who fled ISIL and civil war
In wake of attacks, Parisians ask, Why here?
The latest assaults in Paris, Europe’s worst since 2004, leave residents asking why their city was targeted again
Wariness, accusations surround this weekend's China-Taiwan summit
First leaders' meeting since 1940s civil war sparks fears about China's intentions toward democratic, self-ruled Taiwan
Residents in ISIL's Syrian capital fear military conscription
ISIL has reportedly ordered all males aged 15 and older to register their names and addresses with police in Raqqa
Afghan police sex abuse charges raise legal question for US aid
Experts say US military should have reported rampant abuse of boys by Afghan police to the State Department
Jordan's craft brewery brings beer back to its birthplace
Yazan Karadsheh, the founder of Carakale brewery, is on a mission to create a craft beer culture in Jordan
Foreign fighters come home to roost in Jordan
Jordan locks up every disillusioned fighter who returns from Syria, but critics say prison will radicalize them further
Assyrian Christians crowdfund an army to reclaim homeland from ISIL
Financed by a vast diaspora and trained by US vets, the Nineveh Protection Unit wants to 'cleanse' homeland of ISIL
For America's craft beer revolution, brewing battle has come to a head
The independent beer movement has exploded, threatening Big Beer and posing new dilemmas for craft brewers
Russia, China sign deal to bypass US dollar
Analysis: The agreement is a symbolic blow to US global financial hegemony and a signal of Russian-Chinese rapprochement
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Mohammed Ademo
Opinion Editor
Mohammed Ademo is an opinion editor for Al Jazeera America based in Washington, D.C. He is also the founder and editor of OPride.com, an independent news and commentary website on Oromo, Ethiopia and the Ethiopian diaspora. His work has appeared in Foreign Policy, Al Jazeera English, Al Jazeera America, Africa Is A Country, OkayAfrica.com, Think Africa Press, Columbia Journalism Review, the New York Daily News, and various Ethiopian websites. He has dual master's degree in Journalism and International Relations from Columbia University in the City of New York.   stories
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The making of a terrorist bride
In casting Tashfeen Malik as a radicalized foreign wife, Americans avoid confronting the reality of homegrown terrorism
We are all terrorists
The debate on terrorism forces Muslims to participate in an unwinnable argument
Refugees will change Europe for the better
Immigration could help European countries reverse their negative demographic trends and boost their economic growth
Gaza is already unlivable
The tiny Palestinian enclave is likely to experience a major humanitarian catastrophe long before the 2020 UN estimate
Most Americans don’t vote in elections. Here’s why.
The rise of the donor class and the influx of corporate cash have caused many voters to lose faith in politics
World Bank has an accountability problem
Bank fails to protect critics but safeguards its impunity
Equal justice remains elusive for the poor
Lack of access to counsel is a growing problem for U.S. legal system
The militarization of development aid
How war makes USAID a dirty word
ISIL’s feminine mystique
Al-Khansaa Brigade’s manifesto on gender roles offers a sharp alternative to Western feminism
If everyone voted, progressives would win
The best way to create a progressive America is voting reform
Are millennials tolerant racists?
Members of America’s newest generation thinks they are postracial, but data suggest otherwise
Brave little Denmark leads war against coal
Danish energy policies offer model even more admirable than Germany’s
US college students face high debt, shattered dreams
While Germany makes university tuition free, the US allows for-profit colleges to prey on low-income students
Mexican drug cartels are worse than ISIL
Western obsession with the Islamic State is fueled more by bigotry than any genuine assessment of risk or atrocities
Ebola outbreak spotlights the limits of local and international response
Global and West African governments’ actions are inadequate for the danger
#BringBackOurGirls and the pitfalls of schoolgirl feminism
The myopic focus on the plight of Nigerian schoolgirls overlooks narratives of global inequality and Western complicity
The white tourist’s burden
Growing Western demand for altruistic vacations is feeding the white-savior industrial complex
Trapped in a Nightmare
As the Central African Republic falls into barbaric violence between the country's Christians and Muslims, 23,000 refugees — traumatized, malnourished and dying — remain stuck in the town of Boda
Toll of U.S. invasion haunts Iraq
Washington's reconstruction and remediation plan pales in comparison with the destruction left behind
Human rights for thee but not for me
The US lacks moral authority to be global protector of rights
The UN is not above the law
The US should support accountability claim for the cholera epidemic in Haiti
The US should respect Venezuela’s democracy
Simplistic end-of-Chavismo narrative callously dismisses Venezuela’s progress
Supreme Court ruling shields corporations from accountability
Lack of global justice regime burdens victims of human-rights abuses
Egypt and Ethiopia spar over the Nile
Egypt’™s colonial-era veto power over the river’s bounties is untenable
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Nadeem Muaddi
News Editor
Nadeem Muaddi is a news editor with 10 years of experience in online media. Prior to joining Al Jazeera America's digital news team, he worked for BBC, Al Jazeera English and U.S. News & World Report. In addition to leading breaking news coverage, he’s also fluent in spoken Arabic and has particular expertise in editing and reporting stories about the Middle East. He holds a M.A. from Temple University in Political Science, with a focus in International Relations.   stories
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Palestinian journalist to continue hunger strike despite risk of death
Mohammed al-Qeq has so far refused food for 65 days in protest of his detainment without charge in Israeli prison
Lauryn Hill joins black, Palestinian activists in solidarity video
Video, featuring dozens of artists and activists, draws comparisons between black and Palestinian struggles for justice
Young Palestinians sound off on current unrest, Israeli occupation
With talk of third intifada, Palestinians under the age of 30 discuss where they see latest violence heading
US Muslim groups launch fundraiser to help rebuild burned black churches
At least eight predominantly black churches have burned since Charleston shooting; Ramadan fundraiser aims to help
Humans of Syria exposes life beyond the headlines and battle lines
Inspired by photo project Humans of New York, photographers in Syria remind us humanity still exists in war
Where do Gaza’s lions sleep tonight?
Israel’s siege of the Palestinian territory has forced Fat’hi Zoo’s beloved cubs into a refugee camp
Assyrian Christians crowdfund an army to reclaim homeland from ISIL
Financed by a vast diaspora and trained by US vets, the Nineveh Protection Unit wants to 'cleanse' homeland of ISIL
For America's craft beer revolution, brewing battle has come to a head
The independent beer movement has exploded, threatening Big Beer and posing new dilemmas for craft brewers
California high school drops controversial Arab mascot
School officials collaborate with local community and Arab-American rights group to reach suitable compromise
Israel confiscates nearly 1,000 acres of Palestinian land
Israel confiscates nearly 1,000 acres of Palestinian land in the West Bank
Gaza’s underground: A vast tunnel network that empowers Hamas
An extensive system of concrete-lined passageways supports Gaza’s civilian economy and military activity
Rapper’s arrest highlights Morocco ‘politics of revenge,’ activists say
El-Haqed faces criminal charges that supporters say were fabricated to punish him for his political beliefs
Six episodes of 'The Simpsons' that made us scream 'Ay, caramba!'
A look back at some of the most memorable and controversial antics of America's favorite animated family
Arab-Americans cry foul over California high school mascot
Coachella Valley High School's Arab mascot is cause for concern among Arab-Americans
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Ned Resnikoff
Reporter
Ned Resnikoff is a reporter for Al Jazeera America, where he writes on issues related to labor, inequality, poverty and U.S. politics. He was previously a reporter at MSNBC. His work has also been featured in Salon and The Baffler, among other publications.   stories
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Whatever happens to Donald Trump, Trumpism is here to stay
Analysis: The Republican front-runner is capitalizing on political forces that will outlast his candidacy
Outspoken socialist politician declares victory in Seattle
City council member Kshama Sawant urges socialist candidates to follow her lead nationwide
Bernie Sanders confronts a deep divide within the progressive movement
Analysis: Confrontation with Black Lives Matter reveals the tension between movements for economic and racial justice
Black Lives Matter disrupts Martin O’Malley, Bernie Sanders event
Protesters at Netroots event demand ‘a concrete plan’ for stopping black deaths at the hands of police
Iceland’s medical system under strain from all sides
Understaffing, budget shortages and rumors of privatization haunt the small country’s hospitals
Class war comes to Iceland
Iceland's banks are recovering, but the middle class is angry and demanding change, with thousands on strike
Worker-owned tech cooperatives find a niche near Silicon Valley
In The other Silicon Valley,” Al Jazeera takes a look at how California’s tech boom affects the working class. This is part seven of a seven-part series.
As San Francisco wages rise, conversation turns to enforcement
Activists search for ways to guarantee that businesses will comply with minimum wage, other regulations
The Year in Inequality: Racial disparity can no longer be ignored
Analysis: The racial wealth divide is a persistent fact of American life and getting worse
Think riots have never caused change in America? Think again
Analysis: President Obama says violence doesn't spur progress, but history shows a more complex and troubling picture
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Neda Djavaherian
Graphic Designer, Social Media
Neda Djavaherian is a graphic designer with experience in broadcast, web and social media. She helped grow engagement on the Al Jazeera America social media platforms by creating infographics and promos.  
Philip J. Victor
Reporter
Philip J. Victor is a digital news reporter and producer who specializes in coverage of national and international breaking news for Al Jazeera America. He has also covered several sports stories for AJAM that go beyond the game, including the Washington Redskins name controversy, the NFL concussion lawsuit and the ouster of NBA owner Donald Sterling.   stories
MLB pitches Cuba exhibition as Havana balks at idea
Baseball commissioner says a game could be played next year, but Cuban baseball officials say there is no agreement
NFL Deflategate probe ongoing as scientists weigh in on controversy
Investigation continues amid report NFL determined 11 Patriots game balls were underinflated
California high school drops controversial Arab mascot
School officials collaborate with local community and Arab-American rights group to reach suitable compromise
Owner’s defiance on Redskins name change could end up costing him
Daniel Snyder has vowed to never rename his franchise, but experts say that may be the wrong play
Sri Lanka tells NGOs to keep quiet
Government ministry issues directive telling organizations to not hold press conferences or work with journalists
Renee Lewis
Reporter
Renee is a reporter who writes about the environment, social justice, and U.S. and international politics   stories
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The growing potential of energy-efficient pot farms
Cannabis industry is a heavy energy user but has potential to go green with the right technology and incentives
Biggest El Niño effects on US may be yet to come
NASA scientists say weather pattern hasn’t peaked yet, worst impact in US to be seen in next several months
Young Palestinians sound off on current unrest, Israeli occupation
With talk of third intifada, Palestinians under the age of 30 discuss where they see latest violence heading
Exxon knew of human role in climate change in 1981, then funded denial
Despite scientific evidence, fossil fuel companies sowed misinformation about global warming for decades, report says
US Muslim groups launch fundraiser to help rebuild burned black churches
At least eight predominantly black churches have burned since Charleston shooting; Ramadan fundraiser aims to help
First ocean cleaning system to be deployed in 2016
World's first ocean system targeting plastic pollution to launch in 2016
Disaster after disaster in Marshall Islands blamed on climate change
Disaster after disaster hits Marshall Islands as climate change kicks in
DEA approves study using MDMA for anxiety in seriously ill patients
DEA approves first such trial for MDMA; researchers say public support growing for therapy using psychadelic drugs
Dominican Republic activists vow to stop mine
Dominican activists call mining projects new form of colonialism
Israel confiscates nearly 1,000 acres of Palestinian land
Israel confiscates nearly 1,000 acres of Palestinian land in the West Bank
Life in Michigan's dirtiest ZIP code
Some residents call the tar sands industry a threat to public safety, say stricter regulations are needed
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Rhyne Piggott
Former Head of Multimedia
stories
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Fare Game: Taking the rating economy for a ride
Consumers are used to rating products on their quality, but in the digital economy, the customer is often rated as well. Want to take a vacation? Make sure your Airbnb reputation is good. Want to get a car home at night? Check your Uber score. How do these systems change our behavior? Whom do they help, and whom could they hurt? In this graphic short, we investigate how this developing economy is playing out.
Food allergies on a budget
Researchers who examined data from the 2011 and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys found that more than 20 percent of children with food allergies experienced food insecurity. AJAM wrote about one family with food allergies and how one food pantry in Kansas City is hoping to help others like them.
Good enough to fight for the US but missing the mark for citizenship
More than 7,200 members of the military have been caught between two sets of standards: one for military enlistment, another for becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen. The difference means they find themselves unable to become citizens of a country for which they are willing to die. More than a third were turned down because of moral character, according to records obtained through a FOIA request.
Signed, sealed, delivered
During the Vietnam War, a teenager saw violence, prostitution and heroin addiction take hold of his city, and he saw his friends go to war and die. With his country in turmoil, he knew he had to leave. He decided to start a new life in Germany. What he didn”t factor in was that he”d fall for a girl back home in Saigon. Watch a video about a Vietnam War story documented in nine years of love letters.
Finding a place to stay
Across the country, homeless people struggle to find places to sit, sleep and pass time. Interviews with a dozen homeless and formerly homeless people illustrate the sorts of daily challenges people on the streets face. In this award-winning multimedia project, listen to the homeless and formerly homeless as they walk through their day and describe those challenges.
Launched to great expectations, Dickens theme park falls on hard times
Dickens World is a theme park that aims to bring to life Charles Dickens”s Victorian England and educate visitors about poverty”s hardships. But as fate would have it, Dickens World has fallen on hard times. Few people, it seems, want to experience poverty through a theme park.
Terms of Service
In a comic format, AJAM presents a graphic novella about Big Data, privacy and the future of sharing.
Who really runs Washington?
A lot of money is at play in politics, but whom do your elected officials really represent? Fundraising occupies a huge portion of politicians' time, and lobbyists pay huge sums to be in the same room as policymakers. What does that money buy? And what is your role in the political economy? Watch a personalized video about the influence of money in politics.
What's in a name? An audio-visual exploration of names and identity.
In this exploration of identity, Al Jazeera interviewed individuals about their name and meaning. For some, their name represents who they are at different stages of life, and for others, their name is what makes them unique.
How responsible are online services with your passwords?
Each time we create a user account, we place our trust in a company's security protocols to protect the username, password and other personal data required to create the account. Al Jazeera contacted over 40 companies from a variety of industries to find out how they store passwords.
123456 and other things that shouldn't be your password
The Adobe data breach of personal information from 150 million user accounts shows just how vulnerable consumers are when signing up for an online account. The data also reveals just how careless many users are in choosing their account settings, which makes not just themselves, but also others in the database, vulnerable to identity fraud.
Ms. Veteran America: Healing in Heels
More than just a pageant for skinny girls, contestants say, it's a chance to raise awareness about homeless veterans
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Rick Freeman
Digital Copy Editor
Rick is a copy editor for Al Jazeera America who occasionally contributes articles. He came to AJAM in 2015 from The Associated Press, where he was a desk supervisor, editor and reporter.  
Sadaf Syed
Photographer/Photo Editor
Recognized as a leading artist by The White House in 2010, Photojournalist, Sadaf Syed is a photo editor and an award winning photographer, she is best known for breaking down stereotypes as she educates and inspires her audience through the eyes of photography and the perspectives of her subjects.   stories
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Photo diary: Homs family finds a new home in Illinois
Amid fierce US debate over accepting Syrian refugees, one family in a Chicago suburb is grateful to be here
First transgender suicide hotline overcomes growing pains
Until Trans Lifeline, there was no suicide and crisis counseling hotline specifically for transgender people
Police killings of Latinos spark less outrage than when victims are black
Analysis: Families of Latinos killed by police push for a Brown Lives Matter movement
Calif. counties cope with released prisoners, many homeless
Realignment of state corrections system shifts burden to county jails and probation departments
In dry California, water goes to those who drill the deepest
In one of the most regulated states in the nation, no laws apply to groundwater pumping, which means some people go dry
Cali water cops: What you gonna do when they come for you?
State resources officials are aggressively policing the dire shortage by imposing fines on drought rule violators
Murrieta immigration debate: Should they stay or should they go?
This small community is now a microcosm of a national humanitarian and immigration crisis
Illinois mosque faces an increasingly common zoning problem
Congregation in Chicago suburb struggles to find permanent home, amid land use legal battle
Can Arab culture save Detroit? A profile of Moose Scheib
An Arab-American financial wunderkind is betting on the Motor City
Sriracha becoming as American as pizza, tacos and sushi
Despite rising popularity, Asian hot sauce factory bothers California neighbors who complain of burning eyes, headaches
Arab-Americans cry foul over California high school mascot
Coachella Valley High School's Arab mascot is cause for concern among Arab-Americans
Photos: Fast food strike in Manhattan
Workers in New York take part in a nationwide effort to raise wages
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Timothy Bella
Digital Producer/Reporter, "America Tonight"
Timothy Bella is a senior digital producer and reporter for "America Tonight," writing and producing in-depth feature stories for the web. Before coming to Al Jazeera America, Bella was a digital producer for CBS News and a freelance features contributor for The Atlantic. He was the lead researcher for "The System," Armen Keteyian and Jeff Benedict's college football book, which made The New York Times' best-sellers list. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, ProPublica, Grantland, ESPN The Magazine, Men's Health, Salon and Texas Monthly. He received an M.S. as a Stabile investigative fellow at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism and a B.S. in journalism from TCU.   stories
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What have we learned from 500 concussions in 3 years of college football?
In two of the last three seasons, almost half the major college football programs didn't publicly report a concussion
No man's land: When concussions force a college football player to retire
Casey Cochran is one of at least 26 players in college football to have retired in recent years because of concussions
Inside trans bodybuilding
An annual competition gives empowerment new meaning
Voices of Baltimore: Life after Freddie Gray
Meet a few of the young black leaders in Baltimore who are trying to help the city heal and move on
In Baltimore, 'You make it past 18, you're old'
As one of the bloodiest summers in Baltimore's history wraps up, what's next for Baltimore after Freddie Gray?
A trip to a summer camp pushing to end abortion
More than 1,000 teens have gone through activist training at a popular anti-abortion summer camp in Southern California
To draft or not to draft: Vetting NFL prospects linked to sexual assault
Jameis Winston could be the highest-picked player in NFL history to be publicly accused of rape; what does it mean?
SXDiaries: An America Tonight Q&A series
Hear from some of the luminaries featured at the 2015 South By Southwest festival
Could ketamine become the next great depression drug?
Patients, researchers and drug companies look to the future after ‘the biggest breakthrough in depression in 50 years
In Arkansas, white town is a black mark
Residents of Harrison try to fight their reputation as the small town with the most hate groups in America
Breaking good: Preventing overdoses at concerts
Substance-testing organization the Bunk Police wants to rid music festivals of adulterated drugs
Before and after Ryan Freel: How MLB stepped up to concussions
After Freel was the first MLB player diagnosed with CTE, head safety in baseball remains a concern
Can Deion Sanders save Prime Prep Academy from closing?
With Texas recommending the charter school he founded close for its past problems, 'Prime Time' looks to its future
A year later: Remembering the Boston Marathon bombing
12 seconds, 12 months
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Tom Kutsch
News Editor
Tom Kutsch is a news editor and reporter at Al Jazeera America where he focuses on foreign affairs and political economy.   stories
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Jihadi John' may be dead, his symbolism gone — but ISIL's potency remains
ISIL's battlehood success more than one figure
Residents in ISIL's Syrian capital fear military conscription
ISIL has reportedly ordered all males aged 15 and older to register their names and addresses with police in Raqqa
Russia in pole position as US falls behind in race for Arctic resources
Russia leads the way in scramble for Arctic resources
Baltimore: The divided city where Freddie Gray lived and died
The protests in Baltimore aren’t just about Freddie Gray's death and police brutality. They're about the racialized poverty and dearth of opportunity in parts of the city, such as the Sandtown neighborhood where Gray grew up. The numbers tell some of that tale: The city's median household income is well under the Maryland average, the number of abandoned houses swelled in the past decades and the city's public schools are 'hypersegregated' by race.
US says Houthis ‘obviously’ receive Iran support, but experts not so sure
While Iran has expressed affinity for the Houthi rebels in Yemen, the actual level of support remains unclear
Guns in schools: In tragedy’s shadow, efforts for gun reform in Newtown
Grass-roots initiatives aim to keep the ball rolling on national efforts against gun violence.
The blurred lines of native advertising
The dilemmas and potential conflicts of interests that reliance on native advertising poses for journalism.
Ukraine’s opposition: Different roles, different goals
Anti-government protesters clashing with police in Kiev represent a multitude of beliefs and agendas
Nuclear weapons are Israel's 'worst-kept secret,' says Israeli historian
Interview with leading historian of Israel's nuclear weapons
Batman, America and the politics of fear
The morality tales of Hollywood present a vision of widespread societal collapse, as embodied in the Batman trilogy
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Tristan Ahtone
Reporter
Tristan Ahtone is an award winning journalist and member of the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma. Born in Arizona, raised across the United States, and educated at the Institute of American Indian Arts and the Columbia School of Journalism, he has worked as a door-to-door salesman, delivery driver, telemarketer, and busboy. Since 2008, Tristan has reported for The Newshour with Jim Lehrer, National Native News, Frontline, Wyoming Public Radio, Vice, the Fronteras Desk, NPR, and Al Jazeera America. He serves as Treasurer for the Native American Journalists Association. He dislikes going to bed, getting up, and being left alone, as he tends to get into trouble. He lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico.   stories
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Navajo Nation's nutrition crisis
In Part 1 of our America Left Behind series, Al Jazeera looks at a community where 1 in 3 are diabetic or at risk
The United States of bus travel
The people you meet in this country are a trip
Bringing up the bodies
One woman's search for remains in the Bakken oil fields
Priestess dreams
At 18, she's determined to make her way out
The Code for Farewell
Edmond Andrew Harjo, Battery A, 195th Field Artillery Battalion, was a Native American code talker in WWII. He died in Oklahoma on March 31 after receiving a Silver Star for his participation in the Battle of the Bulge and, later, the Congressional Gold Medal. He was one of the last ties to the code talkers.
Radio on the Reservation
Native Americans tune into an old-fashioned technology that keeps languages — and communities — alive
The coolest cowboys are from Indian Country at national rodeo finals
At the Indian National Finals Rodeo, Native Americans give lessons on what a 21st century cowboy looks like
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Vaughn Wallace
Deputy Photo Editor
Vaughn Wallace is the deputy photo editor at Al Jazeera America, overseeing long-term features, projects and international commissions on the web. He was previously the staff producer of LightBox and an associate photo editor at TIME. Wallace has served on juries including the World Press Photo contest, PDN Photo Annual, Photolucida Critical Mass and other awards. He attends the Eddie Adams Workshop each year as a reviewer and regularly lectures at journalism schools around the US. Wallace is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, where he studied journalism and the rhetoric of historic and contemporary photography.   stories
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Up close and personnel: Neither workers nor bosses, human resources professionals straddle two worlds
The neglected back-office world of HR
A Los Angeles poet's revolution of everyday life
As gentrification sweeps the city, Sesshu Foster has quietly become the poet laureate of a vanishing neighborhood
Hands Across the Water
Sea-Watch tries to save the migrants Europe ignores
Life after Michael Brown and Freddie Gray
Two photographers, one from Ferguson and one from Baltimore, interpret life in their communities one year after the deaths of Michael Brown and Freddie Gray. Collaborating with @echosight, AJAM combined photographs from each photographer into a single, unified visual statement. Together these images tell a story that is more than just the sum of its parts.
Mothers of Intervention
After recruiters lured their sons, grieving parents take to the frontlines of anti-radicalism
Finding a place to stay
Across the country, homeless people struggle to find places to sit, sleep and pass time. Interviews with a dozen homeless and formerly homeless people illustrate the sorts of daily challenges people on the streets face. In this award-winning multimedia project, listen to the homeless and formerly homeless as they walk through their day and describe those challenges.
Star Wars Desert Rave
Thousands flock to movie sets in the Tunisian dunes despite political and economic turbulence
A Child Called Tragedy
As Islamic State fighters spread terror, Iraq's once diverse society faces extinction
Woman Warrior
Mitchelene Big Man turns to traditional dance to heal the pains of life and war
From carburetors to curling irons: The secret automotive history of Detroit's Hair Wars
How black hair artists got their start building Fords
Treasured Island
The people of Tangier fear their life, land and heritage could wash away
Trapped in a Nightmare
As the Central African Republic falls into barbaric violence between the country's Christians and Muslims, 23,000 refugees — traumatized, malnourished and dying — remain stuck in the town of Boda
Rocking the symphony
Young black musicians change the face of classical music
Getting by
Some 50 million Americans live below the official poverty line, and millions more are barely making ends meet. This photo series and community project explores how people try to survive.
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Victoria Visgilio
Unit Manager (Director of People and Operations)
Victoria Visgilio is a human resources and media professional responsible for directing all people and operations functions. She is a strategic leader with recognized strengths in innovative recruiting, policy development and compliance, talent development, project management and employee relations. Before Al Jazeera America, she worked at ABC and her own private consulting business.  
Wilson Dizard
Reporter
Wilson Dizard is a reporter for Al Jazeera America. He covers civil rights, gun laws, marijuana policy, criminal justice, police-community relations, water scarcity, Islamophobia and the 2016 general election.   stories
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Optimism running on empty for African immigrants lured by oil dreams
Immigrants in big cities rely on networks from home during a downturn, but community in Williston, N.D., still budding
Reporters losing war zone protection as fighters post propaganda online
Journalists have become targets for kidnappings and killings like never before, AP chief said, calling for new war-crime law
The Homeless Way of Death: Frozen to the floor, no money for a funeral
Harvey Dell Harmon Jr., homeless in Chicago, died of cold this winter. To family and friends, he was no John Doe
Aftermath of a shooting
One Chicago family's experience in a city scarred by gun crime
Northern Ireland hears echo of itself in Israel Palestinian conflict
Graffiti show how some affected by the Irish conflict see reflections of Northern Ireland in Gaza
West Virginians don't fault coal industry for water crisis
Despite environmental disaster, King Coal still seen as savior amid statewide ‘Stockholm syndrome’
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Zoe Barton
Digital Producer, Social Media
Zoe Barton is a digital producer with 5 years of social media experience. She grew the Al Jazeera America Facebook following by a million in 2015.